In a Time of Universal Deceit, Telling the Truth is Revolutionary.
Tuesday, December 7, 2021

My Love I Stay

Will, as did the founders, with heart, blood, forgivness, intertwined with logic a matter of principles insurmountable whence equally applied.

Be thought’s emeritus heeding winds of you my America, in your peril and the clarion ring unending,for liberty must rule the day of all, bend it, wiggle if you must, every day sunsets..

As surely as recent history is our job…Bent to violence has previewed our ignorance, whilst leveling the field of play to less than abject idiocy.

We are so above this, I wonder if this is why my ankles are Cold…

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Republicans: Dems have double standard for Reid

The Republican Party chief called on Senator Harry Reid on Sunday to step down as Senate majority leader over racial comments about President Barack Obama, while Democrats tried to put the issue behind them.

Reid, a key figure in pushing Obama’s agenda through Congress, apologized to the president on Saturday over remarks published in a new book calling Obama a “light-skinned” black man “with no Negro dialect unless he wanted to have one.”

Both Obama and Reid are Democrats.

Republican National Committee Chairman Michael Steele said Reid should step aside as Senate majority leader, saying if a Republican made the same remarks Democrats would be “screaming for his head.”

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Michael Steele: Hell no, I won’t go

The Republican Party’s national chairman says he’s had no thoughts of resigning despite criticism of his first-year performance and controversy about his recent book that takes shots at the GOP.

Michael Steele is apologizing for not alerting Republicans in advance about the book’s release. In the book, he accuses GOP leaders of abandoning conservative principles over the past decade.

Steele also is defending his record as party chairman, saying he’s “pushing the ball” for the GOP and helping the party win elections and raise money.

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If sex is a mind game, this robot delivers the goods

A New Jersey company says it has developed “the world’s first sex robot,” a life-size rubber doll that’s designed to engage the owner with conversation rather than lifelike movement.

At a demonstration at the Adult Entertainment Expo in Las Vegas on Saturday, the dark-haired, negligee-clad robot said “I love holding hands with you” when it sensed that its creator touched its hand.

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NBC pulls plug on Leno’s prime-time show

NBC said Sunday it decided to pull the plug on the Jay Leno experiment when some affiliate stations considered dropping the nightly prime-time show, and the network is waiting to hear if Leno and “Tonight” host Conan O’Brien accept its new late-night TV plans.

“The Jay Leno Show,” which airs at 10 p.m. EST, will end with the Feb. 12 beginning of the Winter Olympics, said NBC Universal Television Entertainment Chairman Jeff Gaspin. Leno would return to his former 11:35 p.m. slot after the Olympics ended under the network’s new plan, which also calls for O’Brien to retain his job with “Tonight” but at the later hour of 12:05 a.m. EST.

Jimmy Fallon and his “Late Night” would be pushed a half-hour later as well, to 1:05 a.m. EST.

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Pants? We don’t need no stinkin’ pants

Hundreds of New Yorkers have been riding the city’s subway trains in their underwear.

They stripped down to their undies on Sunday for the ninth annual No Pants Subway Ride.

The idea is to act like nothing unusual is going on.

Participants met up at six locations throughout the city. They formed groups and dispersed to subway stations to catch trains. Once inside the subway cars, they began calmly removing their pants and folding them up.

Most people read magazines or chatted with their companions like any other straphanger.

The event started in 2002 with just seven people. It has spread to other cities.

The stunt is organized by Improv Everywhere, a group that says its mission is to cause “scenes of chaos and joy in public places.”

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A good year to die

All those of you who have large accumulations of wealth can die this year.  Well, what I mean is if you do happen to die, there won’t be any federal estate tax liability.  That is right, no “death tax” at all.

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Rethinking the American Dream in Foreclosure, USA

Stockton hardly looks like the most miserable city in the country.

But the statistics and stories over the last two years make a case that it is: Since the housing crisis began, this inland port city 80 miles east of San Francisco has had one of the worst foreclosure rates in the country — for most of the time, the worst.

At the height of it, about 1 in 10 houses fell to foreclosure. Houses that sold for more than $500,000 before the crash now go for $200,000. In some neighborhoods, fixer-uppers cost less than a new Honda Fit — under $20,000.

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For unemployed, new job often means pay cut

Unemployed for nearly a year, David Becker was relieved to land a new job in information technology last summer.

The offer carried a price, though: It was a lower-rung job than the one Becker had lost. He had to uproot his family from Wisconsin to Nevada. And, like many formerly jobless people who find work these days, Becker is now paid far less than before — $25,000 less.

It’s one of the bleak realities of the economic recovery: Even as more employers are starting to hire, the new jobs typically pay less than the ones that were lost.

In the government’s data, a job is a job. More jobs point to a growing economy. But to people who used to earn $60,000, a new $40,000 job means they’ll spend less — and contribute less to the recovery.

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Health care costs up slightly in Senate bill

Americans would see only a modest rise in health care costs under the Senate’s plan to extend coverage to 34 million people who currently go without health insurance, government economic experts say in a new report.

The study found that health spending, which accounts for about one-sixth of the economy, would increase by less than 1 percent than it otherwise would over the coming decade even with so many more people receiving coverage.

Over time, cost-cutting measures could start to reduce the annual increases in health care spending, offering the possibility of substantial savings in the long run. At the same time, however, some of the Senate’s Medicare savings could be unrealistic and cause lawmakers to roll them back, according to Medicare’s top number crunchers.

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