In a Time of Universal Deceit, Telling the Truth is Revolutionary.
Tuesday, December 1, 2020

In final press conference, Bush defends actions

In a nostalgic final news conference, President George W. Bush defended his record vigorously and at times sentimentally Monday. He also admitted many mistakes, from the "Mission Accomplished" banner during a 2003 Iraq speech to the discovery that the alleged Iraqi weapons of mass destruction that he used to justify war didn’t exist.

After starting what he called "the ultimate exit interview" with a lengthy and personalized thank-you to the reporters in the room who have covered him over the eight years of his presidency, Bush showed anger at times when presented with some of the main criticisms of his time in office.

He particularly became indignant when asked about America’s bruised image overseas.

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Bush, Obama will tag team Congress on bailouts

A request for the remaining $350 billion in financial industry bailout funds could come as early as Monday as the Bush administration and President-elect Barack Obama tag-team uneasy lawmakers for the money.

A vote in Congress is likely soon, possibly this week, several senators predicted after a briefing from Obama economic adviser Larry Summers on the Wall Street bailout, as well as on Obama’s separate plan for roughly $800 billion in spending and tax breaks to spur the economy.

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Obama practices bipartisan politics

President-elect Barack Obama steadily reiterates the vital importance of economic issues, this time through a major policy address Thursday at George Mason University. By contrast, he has largely deferred to the outgoing Bush administration on foreign policy and national security. The incoming administration is practicing diplomacy in generally not discussing policy outside of economics.

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Memo to Virginians: Stay home on inauguration day

Washington has a curious way of celebrating Barack Obama’s inaugural. The authorities are shutting down most of the city for the day.

Particularly hard hit will be the capital’s Northern Virginia suburbs. All the downtown bridges between Virginia and Washington will be closed to traffic from 4 a.m. to 7 p.m. and only two of them will be open to pedestrians. One Virginian wondered if they would mine the Potomac River to stop desperate residents of the Old Dominion from paddling across.

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