In a Time of Universal Deceit, Telling the Truth is Revolutionary.
Sunday, April 18, 2021

For those born yesterday

The pursuit of happiness takes many forms and the American people are starved for entertainment. Those two truths taken in combination may explain the Creation Museum, which has just opened in Petersburg, Ky., not far from Cincinnati.

Lacking such an explanation, sensible people might dismiss such an oddity as just another of the devil's works to lure Christians into making themselves look ridiculous for the amusement of atheists, who are desperate for any sort of fun because they can't enjoy Christmas.

To the embarrassment of thoughtful believers, the Creation Museum has been built for people who were born yesterday, or more or less yesterday, because they don't believe in the great geologic periods that spoilsport science insists upon.

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When in the course of human events…

…it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bonds which have connected them with another, and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the laws of nature entitle them, a decent respect for the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation.

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Apologizing for slavery

Germany has apologized for its treatment of Jews in World War II. Australia has apologized to its aborigines. And Tony Blair has apologized to the Irish for Great Britain's handling of the potato famine.

American presidents have come close to apologizing to African-Americans for slavery, and several have spoken of the evil of what some historians call the peculiar institution. Soon, in a measure introduced by Rep. Steve Cohen, D-Tenn., the United States House of Representatives could finally, formally apologize for slavery, Jim Crow segregation and the continuing legacy of discrimination against black people.

As of last week, due in part to a strategy devised to appeal more intimately to potential backers of his congressional resolution, Cohen had collected 90 co-sponsors, including Republican Phil English of Pennsylvania.

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‘When are we going to get out of here?’

One question lingers on the minds of U.S. soldiers serving extended tours in country torn apart by an American-induced civil war.

"When are we going to get out of here?"

McClatchy newspapers reporter Leila Fadel, interviewing soldiers before a photo-p lunch by pro-war Senator Josepth Lieberman at a U.S. field base in Baghdad, said Spec. David Williams, 22, of Boston, brought that singular question from more than 30 of his comrades.

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Hillary’s double standard on use of plane

Senator and Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton trotted out the vague and loose rules of the Senate and Federal Election Commission Wednesday as a rationalization for accepting rides on a private jet from a fatcat contributor.

"Whatever I've done, I complied with Senate rules at the time. That's the way every senator operates," Clinton claimed in an interview with Associated Press reporter Kathleen Hennessey.

Clinton, however, refused to discuss whether the rules are too lax.

"Those were the rules. You'll have to ask somebody else whether that's good policy," she said.

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Troops could be in Iraq for half a century

A vast majority of Americans might want U.S. troops out of Iraq but President George W. Bush wants to keep this country's men and women in uniform in harm's way in that war-torn country for at least 50 years.

Just like Korea.

Although the "official line" from the Bush administration has been that America would not have a "permanent" presence in Iraq, Presidential spokesman Tony Snow admitted Wednesday that current plans accept the fact that "you get to a point in the future where you want it to be a purely support model."

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Democrats did the right thing

To those who see the world through a partisan prism, last week's congressional vote to continue funding American troops in Iraq looks like a loss for Democrats. On the contrary: Those Democrats who refused to legislate an American military defeat — despite intense pressure from a well-financed, well-organized campaign on the left — deserve great credit.

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