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Monthly Archives: December 2002

A nighttime vision

Doug Thompson / Capitol Hill Blue

Doug Thompson / Capitol Hill Blue

The Washington Monument at sunset. "No matter how many times I photograph monuments in Washington," says Capitol Hill Blue photographer Doug Thompson. "Each time is like the first."

Cathedral of color

Doug Thompson Photo

Doug Thompson Photo

Splashes of color from light through the stained glass windows of the National Cathedral in Washington paint a mosiac on the giant columns inside the landmark church. The vast cathedral is a tourist mecca as well as a photographer's delight with its many angles, detailed architecture and even gargoyles. Plus we had a reader request for a photo of the church.

Yeah, right

Doug Thompson photo

Doug Thompson photo

This sign, spotted on Church Street in Martinsville, Virginia, brings all kinds of thoughts to mind (none, we're sure, as intended by the guy who actually had the gall to put the sign outside his law office). An honest lawyer? Can such a thing exist? We'd say the changes of finding an honest lawyer are about as good as proving Bill Clinton's honesty or Brittney Spears' virginity. Perhaps the saddest commentary on this sign is the fact that its owner felt the need to try and convince the public that such an extinct species actually exists. But it could have been worse. He could have claimed to be an "Honest Politician." Maybe that's why most politicians are also lawyers.

Empty days at the mall

Doug Thompson / Capitol Hill Blue

Doug Thompson / Capitol Hill Blue

Footsteps echo in the empty hallways of the Eden Mall in Eden, North Carolina, just two days after Christmas. Eden, once a thriving textile mill town in northern North Carolina, is struggling like many towns where the principal industry has either closed or moved out. On the second shopping day after Christmas, a day when most shopping malls are packed, fewer than 50 cars could be found in the parking lot of Eden Mall. Some store owners say they've been told the mall may close entirely after the holiday season.

When correctly viewed, everyone is screwed

Almost daily, a missive arrives announcing a new effort to “clean up politics.” Usually, these breathless announcements come from one or the other political parties. Their efforts are always aimed at the laughable assumption that one political party in this country is responsible for all the corruption in politics and the other (the one announcing the clean up) is blessed with purity and clean hands.

Moving target

Doug Thompson photo

Doug Thompson photo

A whitetail buck stands on a hilltop in Southside Virginia, watching warily for the hunters he knows are out looking for him. Deer overpopulation is a problem in Virginia and many states and the deer hunting season now runs into January. Even with the longer season, state officials say many of the animals will starve to death during the winter season and many others will die when struck by cars when they venture towards highways in search for food.

The day after

Doug Thompson / Capitol Hill Blue

Doug Thompson / Capitol Hill Blue

It's the day after Christmas and nobody, we mean nobody, escapes the madness known as exchange day at the stores that opened as early as 6 a.m. today. This husband waited for his wife at a shopping mall in Martinsville, VA.

A simple mistake with not-so-simple consequences

The story came in late as the skeleton staff working in The Roanoke Times on Christmas Eve wrapped up the single edition that would go out the next morning.

When the going gets tough, the tough go shopping

Doug Thompson / Capitol Hill Blue

Doug Thompson / Capitol Hill Blue

So, what does a beleagured husband do when his wife insists on going to a mall on Christmas eve "just to pick up a few things." If the husband is Capitol Hill Blue photographer Doug Thompson, he pulls out his camera, catches her in the act, and then posts the photo on the web. Sneaky? Right. Dangerous? Most definitely. With luck, Thompson's health insurance is paid up.

Racism crosses all party, ethnic lines

You can’t go very far in any direction in the Commonwealth of Virginia without running into a reminder of what my granddaddy always called “the war of Northern aggression.” Virginia remembers the war with reverence, a fact that my Yankee born and bred wife always notes with some amusement.