Get rid of hate? Let’s start with America’s ‘hatemonger-in-chief’

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In the aftermath of another spate of mass killings, where one or perhaps both were borne out of the growth of domestic terrorism that now threatens this nation constantly, America’s lame, racist, lying president tried — and failed — to deflect his own responsibility for turning our land into a toxic center of hate and violence.

The assault-style weapon wielding gunman echoed Donald Trump’s vile anti-immigration rhetoric in a hate-filed “manifesto” published online before he killed 32 people in El Paso and left nearly as many wounded, maimed and struggling for life.

Trump tried to blame the news media, then video games and then a failing mental health system before he issues criticism of the white supremacists who helped put him in the white house.

Responds former president Barack Obama:

We should soundly reject language coming out of the mouths of any of our leaders that feeds a climate of fear and hatred or normalizes racist sentiments, leaders who demonize those who don’t look like us, or suggest that other people, including immigrants, threaten our way of life, or refer to other people as subhuman, or imply that America belongs to just one certain type of people.

Joe Biden, the candidate leading the polls in the race to replace Trump as president in 2020, says the current resident at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue “looks like he just flat abandoned the theory that we are one people” and adds that he “used the presidency to encourage and embolden white supremacy.”

Former New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg, who is financially backing a crusade for gun control, calls Trump’s comments “the usual dodge” and said the “new atrocities need to change the political dynamic” on guns in America.

New Jersey Senator Cory Booker, another Democratic candidate for president, called Trump’s comments “bullshit soup of ineffective words.”  Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren, also running for Trump’s job, says he must be held accountable for “amplifying these deadly ideologies” of white supremacy, racism and bigotry.

In Colorado, former state lawmaker Mike Johnston, is challenging GOP Sen. Cory Gardner in 2020, and says Trump “created this toxic culture that includes white nationalists.”

Johnston adds:

Either you’re on the side of the white nationalist holding the AR-15, or you’re on the side of the millions of Americans living in fear of them.

Trump, of course, dismisses any claims that he or his rhetoric are to blame.

“Mental illness and hatred pulls the trigger, not the gun,” Trump says.

Experts on mental health disagree.  Most people with mental health problems are far more likely to be victims of violent crimes than perpetrators, they say.

“Until we begin to have our political leaders speaking more accurately to these issues, it’s up to us to put the facts out there,” said Arthur Evans, chief executive officer of the American Psychological Association.

Trump also claims he has no connection to white nationalists.

Most Americans appear to disagree.  A March survey from Pew Research Center, found 56 percent of Americans feel Trump has done “too little to distance himself from white nationalist groups.”

Pew said the concern came from at least 25 percent of voters who called themselves Republicans and/or Trump supporters.

Conservative magazine National Review, in an editorial published Monday, said Americans and their government muse take on “a murderous and resurgent ideology — white supremacy.”

The editorial said Trump “should take the time to condemn these actions repeatedly and unambiguously, in both general and specific terms.”

Trump’s response?

“Hate has no place in America,” he  says. “Our nation must condemn racism, bigotry and white supremacy.”

He did not, however, say he personally disagrees or condemns racism, bigotry or white supremacy.  He’s previously said that he found “some very fine people” among the white supremacists who brought violence and death to Charlottesville, Va., in 2017.

OK, Mr. president.  We agree with you that hate has no place in America.  Since much of the hate that exists in this nation today comes out of your toxic mouth, then why don’t you shut up and leave.

Let’s start with getting rid of America’s hatemonger-in-chief, the man who routinely spouts racism and bigotry.

You, sir, are the nation’s number one domestic terrorist.  Getting rid of you and your hate is a start to rebuilding the America you have tried to destroy.

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