Donald Trump’s House of Lies

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Reading the news on this Sunday morning shows a lot of attention by the media president Donald Trump calling his tribe the “party of health care” when neither he nor his party have any proposed program to replace the Affordable Care Act, better known as Obamacare.

Trump’s Republicans are running for cover on this one.

Report Seung Min Kim and Josh Dewey of The Washington Post this weekend:

Republicans have no intention of heeding President Trump’s urgent demands for a new health-care plan to replace the Affordable Care Act, fearing the potential political damage that such a proposal could cause in 2020 and hoping he will soon drop the idea, according to interviews with numerous GOP lawmakers, legislative staffers and administration aides.

Not only is there no such health-care overhaul in the works on Capitol Hill — there are no plans to make such a plan.

In other words, more lies from a president who has no allegiance to truth.

Trump used to call up newspapers and magazines and claim he was a “press agent” named John Miller or John Barron.

Reported The Washington Post in 2016:

A recording obtained by The Washington Post captures what New York reporters and editors who covered Trump’s early career experienced in the 1970s, ’80s and ’90s: calls from Trump’s Manhattan office that resulted in conversations with “John Miller” or “John Barron” — public-relations men who sound precisely like Trump himself — who indeed are Trump, masquerading as an unusually helpful and boastful advocate for himself, according to the journalists and several of Trump’s top aides.

The Post detailed calls like the one Sue Carswell, a People magazine reporter assigned to do a story on Trump’s affair with Marla Maples, who became his second wife after he divorced Ivana, received after she left a message requesting an interview.

Within five minutes, Carswell got a return call from Trump’s publicist, a man named John Miller, who immediately jumped into a startlingly frank and detailed explanation of why Trump dumped Maples for the Italian model Carla Bruni. “He really didn’t want to make a commitment,” Miller said. “He’s coming out of a marriage, and he’s starting to do tremendously well financially.”

Miller turned out to be a remarkably forthcoming source — a spokesman with rare insight into the private thoughts and feelings of his client. “Have you met him?” Miller asked the reporter. “He’s a good guy, and he’s not going to hurt anybody. . . . He treated his wife well and . . . he will treat Marla well.”

In typical Trump fashion, he called the Post report “Fake News” and claimed he never pretended he was his own publicist.

In 1990, however, Trump testifying in court under oath, said: “I believe on occasion I used that name.”

A voice analyst used the Post verified that the voice of “John Miller” on that interview tape was, in fact, Trump.  The same conclusion from examination of other tapes of phone interviews with both “John Miller” or “John Barron.”

In 2016, 44 minutes into a telephone interview with Trump about his finances, a Post reporter asked: “Did you ever employ someone named John Miller as a spokesperson?”

Trump hung up without saying anything.  Attempts to call him back went to his secretary, who said: “I heard you got disconnected. He can’t take the call now. I don’t know what happened.”

Stunts by this president includes fake Time magazine covers posted in his golf clubs with his photo.

Donald is not the only Trump who lies.  At the Republican National Convention in 2016, Melania Trump, the former nude photographer’s model who is the president’s third wife, told the crowd she graduated from the University of Ljubljana in Slovenia with a degree in architecture.

Her website said the same thing.  So did her biography on Trump’s campaign website.

The University, however, says she finished just one year of studies at the school and left to pursue her modeling career.  With her lie discovered, her website went dark and her biol disappeared from the campaign site.  She also came under fire for using lines from Michele Obama’s speech at the 2008 Democratic Convention in 2008.

Trump blamed the plagiarism on speechwriter Meredith McIver.  Before that revelation, Melania claimed she had written the speech.

Lies, misinformation and exaggerations have become routine in Washington nowadays.  In January, the Fact Checking service of The Washington Post found 8,158 “false or misleading” statements by the president in his first two years in office.  On Feb. 17,  the count was 8,718.  It will top 10,000 by year’s end.

In 2018, Trump issued an average of 16.5 lies a day.

In a heated discussion with a Trump supporter over coffee recently, he said Trump “is the only president who gives Americans the truth.”

I asked for an example.

“The tax cut,” he said.  “Trump delivered the largest tax cut in American history.  He promised to do it and he did.”

Although Trump claims his tax cut is “the largest ever in this country, data from the U.S. Treasury Department says otherwise.  Trump’s tax cut amounts to 0.9 percent of Americans Gross National Product, which ranks it eighth largest since 1918.   His tax cut ranks behind two of the tax reductions of previous president Barack Obama , two by Harry S. Truman or cuts by Ronald Reagan and Lyndon Johnson.

The Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget ranks modern era tax cuts this way:

Our current president should call himself the “Liar in Chief.”  Of course, he would claim that is “fake news” but the real fake news coming out of Washington these days comes out of the diarrhea mouth of Donald John Trump.

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