HHS: Reuniting children is a ‘burden’

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On Friday HHS basically admitted that when they separated children from their migrant parents they never anticipated reuniting them, and didn’t bother gathering the information they’d need to bring the families together. As appalling as that is, they said it would be too much of a “burden” to reunited parents and children. If you want to read proof of the government’s callousness and incompetence here’s their nine page response to the ACLU lawsuit.

Lee Gelernt, lead attorney in the ACLU lawsuit demanding reunification and deputy director of the ACLU’s Immigrants’ Rights Project, had issued this statement::

“The Trump administration’s response is a shocking concession that it can’t easily find thousands of children it ripped from parents, and doesn’t even think it’s worth the time to locate each of them. The administration also doesn’t dispute that separations are ongoing in significant numbers. We will be back in court on February 21.”

In response to the ACLU lawsuit the government complained that 100 analysts would have to work eight hours each day for between seven and 15 months to “even begin reconciling” data on separated families and said ORR didn’t have the staff to accomplish this.

Are these people sociopaths who draw a wall of empathy between white people and brown people? The kindest explanation I can come up with is that they misunderstood the King’s James Version of the Bible’s famous line: “But Jesus said, Suffer little children, and forbid them not, to come to me: for of such is the kingdom of heaven.”

During Jesus’ time (the Got Questions website tells us) children were not necessarily regarded as special or particularly endearing, except to their own parents. The disciples most likely rebuked those bringing the children to Jesus because they felt bringing children to Jesus was socially improper or because they thought the children would bother Jesus. But Jesus wanted the children to come to Him. He said, “Let the children come” with the meaning of “suffer” being “to allow.” He wanted to bless them.

I have a few lines for Stacey Abrams, whose parents were both Methodist ministers, when she delivers the Democratic response to Trump’s State of the Union address. Trump will paint a picture of the state of the union as glorious and he may brag about what he considers to be his accomplishments, from getting a credibly accused rapist onto the Supreme Court to using his “Art of the Deal” skill to get North Korea to denuke.

I’d like to hear Stacey Adams say that Trump can demand billions to build a wall but doesn’t care enough to allocate the resources to reunite children taken, at times crying and forced from the arms of their parents because of his zero-tolerance policy, with their families.

The minister’s daughter could end with: “Mr. President, as long as this nation has children separated from their families, and considers it a ‘burden’ to reunite them, the state of the union is not good. When Jesus said suffer the little children, He didn’t mean make the little children suffer. If you want to make America great, start with the little children.

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