Senators Susan Collins, Jeff Flake, Lisa Murkowski.

After a day that alternated from the gut-wrenching testimony of a woman who talked about a life-changing assault on her more than three decades ago at the hands of a manipulating, often-drunk prep school youth of privilege to a calculated rage of that man who is now a heartbeat from a permanent seat on the American Supreme Court, a Senate committee led by 11 white men who put political partisanship votes on sending the scandal-scarred nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to the full body for approval or denial.

The vote by the Senate Judiciary Committee Friday depended largely on whether or not retiring Republican Senator Jeff Flake decided if he is a party functionary or a man who puts his country before before the disgusting display of misogyny and advance White House madman Donald Trump’s dictatorial takeover of what once was a great country.

But Flake announced Friday morning that he is supporting Kavanaugh. It will take two Republicans to back off voting for him in the full Senate to stop Kavanaugh ln the floor on Tuesday of next week.

College professor Dr. Christine Blasey Ford’s riveting testimony swayed many Americans who listens to a credible woman who talked about the horrendous sexual attack by Kavanaugh at a drunken teenage party by 17-year-old Kavanaugh in a suburban home in Maryland back in the 1980 when she was 15.

The efforts of the Republican leadership to rush through an appointment of Kavanaugh, and Ford’s testimony Thursday, led the American Bar Association to send an urgent letter to the Judiciary Committee leadership Thursday night, calling for delay in any vote and a full investigation by the FBI into the matter.

Said ABA President Robert Carlson in the letter:

The basic principles that underscore the Senate’s constitutional duty of advice and consent on federal judicial nominees require nothing less than a careful examination of the accusations and facts by the FBI.

Deciding to proceed without conducting an additional investigation would not only have a lasting impact on the Senate’s reputation, but it will also negatively affect the great trust necessary for the American people to have in the Supreme Court.

Harvard Law School scholar Alan Dershowitz agrees:

Maybe we can get closer to the truth, although that is not certain, but right now there are too many unanswered questions to bring the confirmation of Kavanaugh to a vote of the Judiciary Committee as scheduled on Friday, much less to a vote of the full Senate.

Dershowitz adds that it is “possible that one of them is deliberately lying. Right now, there is no way of knowing for certain, which is why the FBI needs to talk to the judge’s accusers and others.”

Such recommendations will be ignored by Republican leaders, the same ones who delayed the need for a new justice for nearly a year to keep Barack Obama to appoint a new justice after the death of Antonin Scalia.

Writes Marc Fisher of The Washington Post:

The result was affirmation that Washington is as broken as it has ever been. Based on what the senators in the room said, the result was, once again, people hearing mostly what they were inclined to believe. The result, far from clarity, was a complex rush of emotions adding up to two families left in wreckage and a political system without even a pathway to cooperation.

The only chance of stopping the confirmation of an accused sexual abuser and hard-drinking judge to the Supreme Court now rests two female Senators — Lisa Murkowski of Alaska and Susan Collins of Maine — remain on the fence.

Are they Americans or just party hacks?  We shall see.

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Copyright © 2018 Capitol Hill Blue

 

Doug Thompson published his first story and photo at age 11 -- a newspaper article about racism and the Klan in Prince Edward County, VA, in 1958. From that point on, he decided to become a newspaperman and did just that -- reporting news and taking photos full-time at his hometown paper, becoming the youngest full-time reporter at The Roanoke Times in Virginia in 1965 and spent most of the past 55+ years covering news around the country and the globe. After a short sabbatical as a political operative in Washington in the 1980s, he returned to the news profession in 1992. Today, he is a contract reporter/photojournalist for BHMedia and owns Capitol Hill Blue and other news websites.

3 COMMENTS

  1. I think it is possible to be both an American and a party hack. Being an American encompasses a great deal of things, some of which might seem contradictory.

    Ted Kaczynski is an American. So’s Timothy McVeigh and George W. Bush. (Guess which one killed off the most other Americans?). Some would claim Genl. Robert E. Lee was an American (who’d top Bush in that record, if he was). A very large number of Americans are complete asshats – Get that through your head, and the election of Mr. Trump makes a lot more sense.

    Some of those asshats are in the United States Senate. Jon

    PS – Personally? I’m an American Asshat too. But I’m not a Senator. J.

  2. I would like to give Lindsey Graham an Atomic Wedgie, in public.. But since that is not possible. Turn out the lights, America is no more..People have no will to fight for anything but money and if you don’t toe the party line your time at the trough will be negated.. I’m glad I will die soon so I don’t have to learn to speak Russian and witness the death of my beloved country..

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