Less than a year ago, after white-nationalists sponsored a rally that killed a counterprotestor in Charlottesville, VA, a lot of people shook their heads and spoke with dread about what America needed to do with the racists and haters who say “your can never be too white.”

Maybe all they needed to do was nothing.  Leave the trailer trash alone and let them dilute their movement with anger, disrespect and implosions within their own ranks.

The Traditionalist Worker Party, the largest of the white supremacists groups, dissolved last month and Andrew Anglin, founder of the Daily Stormer website or hate and racist, is hiding from a harassment lawsuit and the very hate he preached.

Alt-right spokesman Richard Spencer cancelled a public speaking tour and his attorney no longer wants anything to do with him.

“Things have become harder and we paid a price for what happened in Charlottesville,” Spencer says.  “The question of whether there is going to be a third act.”

White supremacists (who prefer to be called “white traditionalists”) make up much of the “base” of president Donald Trump’s rapid support — a base that wants a whites-only society and espouses racist, anti-Semitic and misogynistic hate in the Internet and across the country.

Trump’s presidency spawned a growth spurt of the neo-Nazi groups in 2017.  The Southern Poverty Law Center reports the growth fo such groups rose from 99 to 121 in just the first year of Trump’s term.

But Heidi Beirich of SPLC tells The Washington Post the movement is “imploding.”

“The self-inflicted damage, the defections, the infighting is so rampant, it to the point of almost pathetic,” she says.

Marilyn Mayo, who studies hate groups fo the Anti-Defamation League’s Center on Extremism, agrees the alt-right movement is “on a downward spiral, but it doesn’t mean they’re going to disappear and regroup.”

Stormfront, a white-supremacist online forum, is a financial trouble after donations dried up.  The Traditionalist Worker Party operated in eight states with 1,200 paying members and was run out of a trailer park in Paoli, IN but collapsed after a fiight broke-out between co-founders Matthew Heimbach and Matt Parrott — who lived in adjoining trailers.

Heimbach started sleeping with Parrott’s wife, the SPLC reports, and the fight that broke out over discovery of the affair left him charged with felony domestic battery.

“I’m unplugged from politics,” Parrott told the Post. “I’m done.  I’m out.  I don’t want to be in The Washington Post anymore.  I don’t care to have this humiliating and terrifying ordeal to be more than public than it already is.   There is no more Trad Worker.”

The organization’s web site went dark.  Some party members have started “the Nationalist Initiative” an a new branch.

A tweet to the new group’s 68 “followers” said “TWP failed.  What comes from the ashes?”

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Copyright © 2018 Capitol Hill Blue

Doug Thompson published his first story and photo at age 11 -- a newspaper article about racism and the Klan in Prince Edward County, VA, in 1958. From that point on, he decided to become a newspaperman and did just that -- reporting news and taking photos full-time at his hometown paper, becoming the youngest full-time reporter at The Roanoke Times in Virginia in 1965 and spent most of the past 55+ years covering news around the country and the globe. After a short sabbatical as a political operative in Washington in the 1980s, he returned to the news profession in 1992. Today, he is a contract reporter/photojournalist for BHMedia and owns Capitol Hill Blue and other news websites.

2 COMMENTS

  1. Haters gonna hate! Doesn’t matter much who. These people just can’t get along with anybody, because they are jerks.

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