For Donald Trump, 2018 erupts with his questionable and corrupt actions of his past and a new focus on his insanity.

The question of the new year is: “Is Trump unstable?”

The answer is obvious: “Of course.”

A blistering new book by Michael Wolff displays Trump in all his tenuous connection with what is left of his sanity, calling him “an undisciplined man-child” who neither expected to win a presidency that he did not want and a White House that includes an equally clueless son who committed “treason” through contacts with Russians who promised to dish out dirt on opponent Hillary Clinton.

In the book, aides to Trump call him undisciplined, unaware of the basic requirements of his new job and a man “without a clue” about laws or rules.

Campaign aide Sam Nunberg, sent to Trump to explain the Constitution to the candidate, says “I got as far as the Fourth Amendment before his finger is pulling down on his lip nd his eyes are rolling back on his head.”

In early August 2016, Trump turned to then-Fox News Chairman Roger Ailes, later fired for repeated sexual harassment, for advice on who should be a chief of staff.  Ailes suggested former speaker of the house John Boehner.

“Who’s that?” Trump asked.

Wolff writes that Secretary of State Rex Tillerson did call Trump a “moron.”  Others referred to the president as an “idiot” or “dumb as shit” and a “dope.”

The book says Trump had little real interest in the Republican goal of repealing Obamacare. Wolff wrote:

An overweight seventy-year-old man with various physical phobias (for instance, he lied about his height to keep from having a body mass index that would label him as obese), he personally found health care and medical treatments of all kinds a distasteful subject. The details of the contested legislation were, to him, particularly boring.

He says Trump was lukewarm, at best, about his Supreme Court appointee, Neil Gorsuch, because he wanted to appoint a “friend and loyalist.”

“In the Trump view, it was rather a waste to give the job to someone he didn’t even know,” Wolff writes.

Katie Walsh, deputy chief of staff to Trump early on, said dealing with Trump was “like trying to figure out what a child wants.”

White House chief economic adviser Gary Cohn calls Trump an “idiot surrounded by clowns.  Trump won’t read anything — not one-page memos, not the brief policy papers; nothing.  He gets up halfway through meetings with world leaders because he is bored. And his staff is no better.”

Writes columnist E.J. Dionne Jr.:

Can our government function normally when President Trump tweets about his “button” being bigger than that of an armed adversary? Can there be business as usual when the word “insane” is being applied with increasing frequency to his actions, and when one of his most loyal supporters has called a meeting between Russian operatives and Trump campaign officials “treasonous”?

Writes Susan Glassner of Politico:

Trump’s national security team and his allies are engaged in a silent conspiracy of sorts to guide and constrain him. America’s enemies in China and Russia have taken their measure of the man and are preparing to test him more decisively than they have yet ventured. Opportunists in the Middle East and elsewhere are taking what they can get. War talk with North Korea grows ever louder. And in Washington, the America Firsters have been purged from the White House staff—but not from the Oval Office itself.

Former Republican Congressman and now MSNBC host Joe Scarborough asked Trump “can you read?”

Trump said nothing.

“I’m serious, Donald.  Do you read,” Scarborough continued.  “If someone wrote you a one-page paper on a policy, could you read it ?”

Trump never answered the question.

Bottom line:  Trump is insane and he is the madman who today poses the greatest threat to the very existence of the United States of America.

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Copyright © 2018 Capitol Hill Blue

1 COMMENT

  1. Some of us knew this in 2015. The only question I have left is how many of those who didn’t know back then will stand up and admit they were wrong.

    Unfortunately, the number of them is very few. Nobody likes to admit they were wrong – and some will go into intricate verbal and mental gymnastics to avoid (or “explain”) having to do so.

    J.

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