Comments

  1. larry brader

    Lies have a half-life of a sort. Illusion work great for theater but in the long run it’s decays’. Especially when folks try to build on it.

    • Jon

      I’d consider updating an old aphorism here. You may have heard “A lie goes around the world while the truth is still putting its boots on”, but I’m tempted to add “But once the truth does get marching, it can prove hard to stop”.

      It’s irregular, of course.

      Few would argue that the sun is drawn across the sky in a chariot these days, and that lightning is thrown by a beardy guy from Mount Olympus. Most are pretty convinced that enslaving other people due to the color of their skin is not right, and that women deserve equal rights as men (although the latter hasn’t quite made it to Saudi Arabia yet, among other places). One doesn’t hear “If Man were meant to fly, God would have given Him wings” very often anymore (and there’s always Red Bull, anyhow).

      Nobody seems to object to stellar evolution, as stars go from a swirling mass of dust to a variety of fates billions of years later, but many virulently object to biological evolution, despite their being FAR more evidence for it. Aside from a Fox commentator (B. O’Reilly) most of us are pretty much convinced that the explanation of the tides comes from the gravitational pull(s) of the Sun and the Moon plus local geographical details (incidentally, during the eclipse was a very high tide) and that magnets work because of atomic spin.

      Few would claim that the only elements out there are Air, Earth, Fire, and Water, and that every number can be represented as the ratio of any two integers (try taking the square root of two, or pi) but equally weird beliefs still persist, that praying for someone a thousand miles away is actually going to help and that homeopathy is more than a mere placebo, but their numbers, although rising and falling over short periods of time, are on a long slow trend downward.

      In a way that makes me an optimist, but I’m not going to be around for the centuries-long view that it takes. Also, of course, presuming that humanity doesn’t eat itself (rhetorically or literally. Climate change wiping out food supplies might well give an entirely different meaning to being ‘invited to a barbeque’).

      Anyhow, have fun,
      Jon