Georgia win might not be enough to save Gingrich

Newt Gingrich appears likely to win the Republican presidential primary in his home state of Georgia on Tuesday but his plan to launch a wider “Southern Strategy” to recover his front-runner status looks less of a sure thing. Gingrich spent much of the last week campaigning on his home turf while main rivals Rick Santorum and Mitt Romney concentrated on trying to win Ohio in the runup to “Super Tuesday,” when 10 states hold Republican nominating contests. A poll by Mason-Dixon Polling & Research showed Gingrich well ahead of his competitors in Georgia, with 38 percent of likely Republican voters
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Rick Santorum’s risky running game

As Pennsylvania Senator Rick Santorum fought for his political life in 2006, his ally Senator Arlen Specter offered a word of advice: Just stop talking. What Specter meant was that Santorum should stop talking about social issues, according to Adrienne Baker Green, a Specter aide who witnessed the exchange. Santorum’s outspoken style on issues such as abortion and women in the workplace, which had once made him a star among social conservatives, appeared to be alienating more moderate Pennsylvania voters who would decide his fate in November 2006. Santorum responded: “I can’t stop. Everyone is listening,” says Baker Green. Specter
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Romney appears to have momentum going into Super Tuesday

Mitt Romney gained momentum on the eve of Super Tuesday as he sought a victory in Ohio that could potentially land a knockout blow on rival Rick Santorum in the Republican presidential race. Voters in 10 states across America will have their say on Tuesday in what promises to be a pivotal day in the see-saw contest to see who will take on President Barack Obama, a Democrat, in the November 6 general election. Ohio, a largely working class swing state in the so-called Rust Belt that is crucial to Obama’s re-election chances, is considered the big prize and a
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Super Tuesday showdown: Hype or a defining day for GOP?

On the eve of their Super Tuesday showdown, Mitt Romney and Rick Santorum strained for an edge in Ohio on Monday and braced for the 10 primaries and caucuses likely to redefine the race for the Republican presidential nomination. Newt Gingrich, though winless for more than a month, campaigned in Tennessee and issued a stream of signals that he intended to stay in the race. In a race marked by unpredictability, Romney’s superior organization and the support of an especially deep-pocketed super PAC allowed him to compete all across the Super Tuesday landscape and potentially pick up more than half
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Will Tuesday be super for Mitt Romney?

As Super Tuesday approaches, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney appears to have regained momentum in his quest for the Republican Presidential nomination. In Ohio, the state that many political watchers consider critical and key among the 10 state contests Tuesday, Romney has closed what was once a double-deficit lead by former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum to a tie. A Reuters/Ipsos poll released over the weekend shows Romney and Santorum tied at 32 percent.  Most political experts feel Santorum must win in Ohio to keep his campaign alive. Some felt the same way about Michigan, where Santorum fell from a double-digit
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What’s so ‘super’ about Super Tuesday?

Super? Maybe not this time. But it is a Tuesday, one with the biggest payout of the Republican presidential primaries. Super Tuesday, slimmed down to half its 2008 size but still doling out one-third of the delegates needed to win, probably won’t settle much. Sure, it could nudge Newt Gingrich out of the race, or lend Ron Paul more credibility. But it won’t be easy for either Mitt Romney or Rick Santorum to score a decisive advantage, because delegates are handed out by share. A close second in a state can pay off almost as well as first place. Win
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Romney notches another win, looks towards Super Tuesday

A Washington state victory in hand, Mitt Romney is looking ahead to Tuesday’s 10-state bonanza that features contests from Alaska to Ohio to Massachusetts, millions in campaign spending and the largest single day of voting yet in the Republicans’ topsy-turvy primary race. The former Massachusetts governor won Saturday night’s low-turnout caucuses, adding another win to his tally and gaining momentum in his drive to the GOP nomination. Leading in delegates to the GOP’s national convention, Romney looked to defend his front-runner standing even while rivals Rick Santorum, Newt Gingrich and Ron Paul sought to keep their candidacies afloat. “The voters
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Super Tuesday: A super headache for the GOP?

For Republicans, “Super Tuesday” will not be quite as super as it used to be. In recent presidential campaigns, the wave of state contests on the same day in February or March has been a defining moment, often settling the Republican race. That will not happen this Tuesday, when 10 states hold Super Tuesday contests that could boost Mitt Romney as the clear front-runner but will not hand him the nomination. Rule changes by Republican Party leaders have stretched out the 2012 nomination process, essentially ensuring it will continue at least into April, and possibly to June. The idea behind
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Ohio: The perfect political microcosm for campaign 2012?

Ohio’s Super Tuesday primary is proving to be the perfect microcosm of the nation’s unruly race for the Republican presidential nomination: Mitt Romney is spending lots of money, Rick Santorum is aggressively courting conservatives and Newt Gingrich is counting on big ideas to swing votes his way. Of the 10 states weighing in on Tuesday, Ohio offers the hottest contest. And with its diverse population, reputation as a presidential battleground and preoccupation with the same economic worries that nag the nation at large, Ohio seems destined to foreshadow the shape of the campaign as it heads toward November. “You seem
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Campaign promises: No, you can’t have it all

Is there any impulse greater in politics than to promise people the sun and the moon? Each in their own way, the Republican candidates heading into Super Tuesday primaries are telling Americans they can have “it all” — plentiful energy without pain at the pump, jobs without deeper debt, thriving factories like the days of yore, a renaissance at every dusty turn. Call it the can-do spirit or, as Barack Obama liked to put it, “Yes we can.” But, seriously. No independent economist believes manufacturing will come rushing back against the global economic tide if the government merely backs off
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