White House

For Bush, if the shoe fits…

President George W. Bush wrapped up a whirlwind trip to two war zones Monday that in many ways was a victory lap without a clear victory. A signature event occurred when an Iraqi reporter hurled two shoes at Bush, declaring: "This is from the widows, the orphans and those who were killed in Iraq."

Bush not willing to let auto industry fail

The Bush administration simply wasn’t willing to stand by and watch the American auto industry financially collapse — the stakes were too huge.

So the administration committed Friday to step in and help avoid the collapse of the industry that was once the backbone of the nation’s economy. Administration officials are talking with those automakers about conditions that must be met to get the aid and have not made final decisions on the size or duration of the help.

A war crimes trial for Bush?

It’s not that long now until we have a new president, and many on the left and some others are salivating because here’s their chance to get George W. Bush, to put him on trial for war crimes, and if doing so tears this nation apart, so what? That’s what justice demands, they say.

The high cost of the ‘R’ word

As he has several times weekly since the onset of the financial crisis, President Bush appeared on the South Lawn of the White House to give a brief statement on the economy, taking no questions.

As per usually, he reiterated the steps his administration is taking to pump up the financial and housing markets and he did again but this time with a difference: A year after the downturn was officially deemed to have started, the president admitted the country was in a recession.

When in doubt, pardon

On the way out the door, presidents have been known to inflict a mountain of damage on the American public with the pardon power. Since President Bush has funneled more garbage into the American political system than just about any president in history, why should we be surprised when he leaves a trail of garbage as he waltzes out the door?

The positive side of Bush’s record

Some days it just doesn’t pay to get up in the morning. President Bush must have felt that way on a growing number of occasions in the last four years as he has watched his presidency slip into the depths of a faltering economy, two wars that have gone on far too long, his administration’s miserable failure in dealing with two hurricanes that nearly wiped out a huge swath of the Gulf Coast, and approval ratings so low they cost his party much of its vitality.

More last minute shenanigans from Bush

Lame duck President George W. Bush may be going but he’s far from gone.

Bush is papering the federal government with last-minue executive orders putting his stamp on everything he can and paying off debts to those who supported him during his controversial Presidency.

Outgoing Presidents often issue last minute rules that they not only hope will last long after they leave office but that will also not be immediately overturned by the incoming resident of the White House.

But Bush’s last-minute glut of rules goes far beyond what has been done by other departing Presidents and often stretches the boundries of what may or may not be legal.

It’s typical Bush and shows the outgoing President is not going quietly. He will be defiant to the end.

The lamest of lame ducks

Congressional lame-duck sessions are notoriously unproductive and this one is no exception.

The Democratic leadership came back after the election with three goals — a bailout for the auto industry, a second economic stimulus package and an extension of unemployment benefits.

Only the relatively uncontroversial granting of a three-month extension of the benefits passed as Congress was leaving town for Thanksgiving recess. Despite some White House grumbling, President Bush signed the measure as he was leaving for Peru.

Texas grand jury indicts Cheney, Gonzalez

A Texas grand jury has issued indictments against Vice President Dick Cheney and former attorney general Alberto Gonzalez over abuse at privately run prisons, court documents showed.

The three-page indictment Tuesday alleges that Cheney profited from the abuse because he invested 85 million dollars in a mutual fund company which holds shares of for-profit prisons.

It said this is a "direct conflict of interest" because Cheney had influence over the federal contracts awarded to the prison companies.

Bush handling transition with grace

No matter how people remember President Bush’s time in office, let there be no doubt about how he wants to end it: gracefully.

Never mind that Democrat Barack Obama spent all that time deriding Bush for “failed policies,” or mocking him for hiding in an “undisclosed location” because he was too unpopular to show up with his party’s own candidate, John McCain. This is transition time. Outgoing presidents support the new guy.

And on that front, Bush is going well beyond the minimum. He has embraced the role of statesman with such gusto that it has been hard to miss.