White House

Surprise, surprise

They were six months late in doing so, but the North Koreans finally lived up to the next step of a nuclear disarmament agreement they signed in 2005.

Too much politics in Justice Dept.

Former Attorney General Alberto Gonzales (Reuters Photo)

U.S. President George W. Bush’s Justice Department improperly injected politics into hiring programs, a department investigation released on Tuesday found.

A report by the department’s inspector general and office of professional responsibility said members of a screening committee were asked to weed out "wackos" and ideological "extremists" who sought work in a competitive honors program for entry-level attorneys or as summer interns.

Bush’s ratings at all-time low

Less than one-quarter of Americans think President George W. Bush is doing a good job, giving him the worst marks of his two-term presidency, a poll showed Tuesday.

The poll also showed 80 percent think the United States is on the wrong track.

Only 24 percent of those surveyed gave Bush a positive rating, a score "worse than that of any president, except for Jimmy Carter (22 percent in July 1980) since Harris first started measuring them," the Harris polling agency, which conducted the survey, said.

Rumsfeld ignored torture warnings

This Pentagon file photo, obtained by The Associated Press, shows Sgt. Michael Smith, left, with his dog Marco, menacing a detainee at an unspecified date in 2003 at the Abu Ghraib prison in Baghdad, Iraq.

Military psychologists were enlisted to help develop more aggressive interrogation methods, including snarling dogs, forced nudity and long periods of standing, against terrorism suspects, according to a Senate investigation.

Protests mark Bush’s Europe tour

Protesters scuffled with riot police in central London Sunday as US President George W. Bush held talks with British Prime Minister Gordon Brown, nearly at the end of a farewell European tour.

Iran and Iraq were expected to on the menu over dinner in Downing Street, whilst the two men meet for more formal talks on Monday, before Bush heads for Northern Ireland and then home.

Protecting Dick Cheney

The House has just passed a bill that would give Vice President Dick Cheney and his successors up to six months of Secret Service protection after leaving office. The secretary of Homeland Security could extend it if warranted.

Bush: ‘Sorry I said that’

President George W Bush admitted on Wednesday that his tough rhetoric had given the world the impression was a "guy really anxious for war" and said he now wished he had used a different tone on the global stage.

Cheney’s WVa joke crashes & burns

Vice President Dick Cheney threw a verbal insult at West Virginians on Monday, but quickly apologized.

Talking about his family roots and how he’s distantly related to Democratic presidential candidate Barack Obama, the vice president noted that he had Cheneys on both sides of his family.

“And we don’t even live in West Virginia,” Cheney quipped.