White House

Out with the old, in with the new

In his first full day as President, Barack Obama went to work dismantling former President George W. Bush’s policies and imprint upon the federal government.

A freeze on enforcing the tidal wave of pending regulations signed by Bush in his final days in office, a meeting with Pentagon officials to start work on withdrawal from the Iraq war, closing the controversial prison at Guantanimo, freezing White House pay and new restrictions on lobbying were among Obama’s initial moves.

And more will come in the coming days, weeks and months.

Time to get back to business

Can we get back to normal now? Can we get down to addressing the myriad of problems that plague us? Can our feet touch the ground and our minds grasp reality?

Being in Washington this past week has been like living in a dream world, where everyone’s excited, happy, rich, starry-eyed, star-studded and fancy free. This is nothing like the real United States where stocks have lost trillions of dollars in value, credit is ridiculously tight, unemployment is at record highs, houses are being ripped out from under defaulting owners and jobs do not exist.

Not your father’s inauguration

Inaugurations are extraordinary events. They are as much for the people as for the new president, which is as it should be. We the people want to be involved, and not just because we are desperate for entertainment in the dead of winter.

When you stop to think about it, most of us will go through life without ever being inaugurated for anything, let alone president of the United States.

Barack Obama takes his place in history

Before a jubilant crowd of more than a million, Barack Hussein Obama claimed his place in history as America’s first black president, summoning a dispirited nation to unite in hope against the "gathering clouds and raging storms" of war and economic woe.

Obama’s obvious & subtle historical significance

The inauguration of Sen. Barack Obama of Illinois as the 44th President of the United States Tuesday is an historic occasion in ways subtle and obvious. As the first African-American to hold the highest national office, he personifies a particularly important milestone.

Race relations have been very challenging throughout American history. Abolition of slavery ultimately involved the Civil War, the most costly-armed conflict by far for Americans, with over 600,000 deaths.

Obama’s moment through a child’s eyes

As inspiring as our new president’s inaugural address was, both to a nation shaken by the shattering of economic institutions and to a world anguished by suffering intentionally inflicted upon humans by other humans, Barack Obama’s eloquent words were merely the day’s second most meaningful message.

Obama’s somber, but necessary, inaugural message

Facing the largest and happiest crowd in national-capital history, Barack Obama opened his presidency with an eloquent and inspiring inaugural address in which he acknowledged he was taking the oath of office "amidst gathering clouds and raging storms."

With the markets falling even as he spoke, Obama showed the confidence and optimism that Americans expect of their presidents. The challenges we face are real and difficult, he said, but "they will be met."

Barack Obama becomes America’s 44th President

Stepping into history, Barack Hussein Obama grasped the reins of power as America’s first black president on Tuesday, saying the nation must choose "hope over fear, unity of purpose over conflict and discord" to overcome the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression.

Text of Obama’s inaugural address

Text of President Barack Obama’s inaugural address on Tuesday, as prepared for delivery and released by the Presidential Inaugural Committee.

OBAMA: My fellow citizens:

I stand here today humbled by the task before us, grateful for the trust you have bestowed, mindful of the sacrifices borne by our ancestors. I thank President Bush for his service to our nation, as well as the generosity and cooperation he has shown throughout this transition.

Obama poised to step into history

Stepping into history, Barack Hussein Obama grasps the reins of power as America’s first black president in a high-noon inauguration amid grave economic worries and high expectations.

Braving icy temperatures and possible snow flurries, hundreds of thousands of people descended on the heavily guarded capital city Tuesday for the first change of administrations since the terror attacks of Sept. 11, 2001.

The capital city, a quick starter on even the most ordinary of days, took on the kind of frenetic predawn life rarely seen. The streets were becoming populated well before daybreak, and competition for space on the Metro subway system was fierce. Several suburban parking lots for subway riders were filled to capacity well before 6 a.m.