Archives for White House

Court slaps Bush down…again

In the latest setback for the Bush Administration, a federal appeals court slapped the President down for violating the constitutional rights of a U.S. resident through use of the questionable and discredited "military tribunals." Even worse for Bush, the rebuke came from a conservative federal appeals court that the White House thought would rule favorably but the court said the President cannot order people locked up as long as he wants by calling them "enemy combatants." Instead, the court ruled, Bush should follow the law and the Constitution but the President, as he always does, plans to appeal. The fight continues.
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Serving justice

We don't use the word "condign" very often these days. In case you're unfamiliar with the term, it means "worthy" or "suitable," but since the end of the 17th century, it's been used almost exclusively in conjunction with the word "punishment," to indicate a penalty that properly suits the crime.
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If it quacks like a lame duck

George W. Bush is very much a lame-duck President and that message was driven home this week with the total collapse of the "grand bargain" immigration bill which failed dramatically in the Senate.

The defeat is a bitter pill for a President who has rode roughshod over Congress for the last six-and-a-half years and his growing inability to move or affect legislation showcases a shifting of power from one end of the Capitol Hall to the other.

For many, that shift is long over due.

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Bush hires new lawyers to fight Congress

President Bush is signing up legal help as he girds for battle with the Democratic-led Congress.

Faced with a flurry of document requests and expanding congressional investigations, the White House announced Friday that Bush had hired nine lawyers, including five who’ll fill new jobs in the president’s legal office. The recruits have solid experience in white-collar crime, government investigations and constitutional law.

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The politics of pardons

Will George W. Bush pardon Lewis "Scooter" Libby?

Good question and one that has both the right and left buzzing. Conservatives are not just requesting, but demanding that Bush pardon the former Vice Presidential chief of staff sooner than later but Bush appears in no hurry to let Libby off the hook for his conviction of lying to investigators and obstruction of justice.

And while Democrats argue publicly against a pardon they hope privately Bush will do so because they feel it will be an issue to use against Republicans.

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Cheney lied about Bush spy program

Vice President Dick Cheney lied about his involvement in developing President George W. Bush's controversial and illegal program to use the National Security Agency to spy on Americans.

New revelations show Cheney was hip deep in developing the policy, often overruling the objections of Justice Department officials and blocking the promotion of one official who disagreed with him on the warrantless wiretapping program.

The same disclosures also show Attorney General Alberto Gonzales lied about his role in trying to get approval of the program from previous Attorney General John Ashcroft.

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Bush’s war czar pick doubted troop surge

President George W. Bush's handpicked "war czar" doubted the President's latest "troop surge" would work and expressed his doubts during a White House policy review.

Lt. Gen. Douglas Lute has confirmed he voiced his skepticism that the plan would work unless the Iraqis stepped up to the plate and launched its own "surges" to stop the actions.

The revelations come as Lute faces his first day of confirmation hearings before the Senate.

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