White House

The President’s ‘yes’ man

Attorney General Alberto Gonzales says his long friendship with President Bush makes it easier to say "no" to him on sticky legal issues. His critics, however, say Gonzales is far more likely to say "yes" — leaving the Justice Department vulnerable to a politically determined White House.

Bye bye Wolfie!

Paul Wolfowitch (Reuters)Trying to put a controversy behind it, the Bush administration was wasting no time finding a successor to World Bank President Paul Wolfowitz, who will resign over his handling of a pay package for his girlfriend.

Wolfowitz on Thursday announced that he would step down at the end of June, his leadership undermined by a furor over the compensation he arranged in 2005 for Shaha Riza, a bank employee.

His departure ends a two-year run at the development bank that was marked by controversy from the start, given his previous role as a major architect of the Iraq war when he served as the No. 2 official at the Pentagon.

It also ends a potential political headache for President Bush, who had named Wolfowitz to the post.

The Lone Ranger

Paul McNulty's resignation from the second highest job in the Justice Department couldn't have come at a worse time for Attorney General Alberto Gonzales even if the financial needs of raising a family was McNulty's primary motivation and not the political scandal swirling around the firing of the U.S. attorneys. The pressure for Gonzales to follow suit has just been turned up.

House wants Gitmo plan

Shrugging off a possible veto from President George W. Bush, the U.S. House of Representatives on Thursday demanded the administration develop a plan to transfer detainees from the military prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

Justice Dept. to Congress: Talk to Karl

The Justice Department has a simple message for Congress: If you want Karl Rove's emails, talk to Rove.

The boys at Justice say they can only find two of the missives that some say will prove Rove was up to his keister in the scandal over politically-motivated firings of U.S. attorneys.

The end of days?

Paul Wolfowitz
Paul Wolfowitz (AP)

Paul Wolfowitz's future as World Bank president rests with the 24 board members who are trying to resolve conflict of interest charges that have roiled the poverty fighting institution.

The board planned to resume deliberations Thursday.

Wolfowitz wants a face-saving deal that would allow him to resign under his own terms and escape some blame for the furor involving his girlfriend's compensation.

Bush ignored the law and Justice Department to continue domestic spying

James Comey
James Comey testifies (AP)

Call it another classic example of an out-of-control Presidential administration trampling the Constitution into the dust. It took the personal intervention of President George W. Bush in 2004 to circumvent the law, ignore the protests of his own Attorney General, and continue an illegal eavesdropping program that spied on Americans.

Even then Attorney General John Ashcroft knew what the President wanted to do was illegal and threatened to resign over the White House actions.

But Bush, as he has done so many times before and enabled by administration yes man Alberto Gonzales, put himself and his agenda above the law and proceeded, knowing that he could ride roughshod over the Constitution, stare down a cowardly Congress and ignore the inevitable court decisions that would fact his acts unconstitutional.

Turn out the lights, the Wolfowitz party is over

Looks like embattled World Bank President Paul Wolfowitz is the latest casualty of the George W. Bush "Brownie you're doing a heck of a job" syndrome.

After weeks of "unqualified" support, White House officials are now backing away from Wolfie faster than a champion horse at The Kentucky Derby.

Clearly, Wolfowitz's days are numbered.

McNulty out at Justice Department

Paul McNulty (AP)
 Paul McMulty (AP)

Deputy Attorney General Paul McNulty said Monday he will resign, becoming the highest-ranking Bush administration casualty in the furor over the firing of U.S. attorneys.

Politics played major role in attorney firings

Alberto Gonzales (AP)
Alberto Gonzales (AP)

Politics played a major role in the firings of at least half of the U.S. attorneys targeted for removal by the Bush Administration last year.

Despite claims by Attorney General Alberto Gonzales and the White House that the lawyers were removed "for cause," newly-discovered documents show complaints by Republican lawmakers resulted in removal of at least six of the attorneys and possibly more.