White House

Recurring debate on executive privilege

If history is a guide — and on this constantly recurring controversy it usually is — the so-called constitutional showdown under way between the White House and Capitol Hill over “executive privilege” will likely end with a convoluted compromise that decides little.

Every administration has at least one set-to with Congress over “executive privilege,” which the White House says prevents the Hill from compelling an administration official to testify.

Bush claims critics wrong about Iraq

President Bush took his critics to task Saturday for using the poor marks the Iraqi government received on a progress report this week as reason to argue that the war is lost.’

Bush acknowledged the Iraqis received “unsatisfactory” marks on eight benchmarks, including failure to prepare for local elections or to pass a law to share oil revenues among Sunnis, Shiites and Kurds. But the president said “satisfactory” grades the Iraqis received in eight other areas — like providing three Iraqi brigades for the military offensive under way and providing $10 billion of their money for reconstruction — were cause for optimism.

“Our strategy is built on the premise that progress on security will pave the way for political progress,” Bush said in his weekly radio address. “This report shows that conditions can change, progress can be made, and the fight in Iraq can be won.”

Bush calls CIA leak story ‘old news’

President Bush always said he would wait to talk about the CIA leak case until after the investigation into his administration’s role. On Thursday, he skipped over that step and pronounced the matter old news hardly worth discussing.

“It’s run its course,” he said. “Now we’re going to move on.”

Despite a long history of denouncing leaks, Bush declined to express any disappointment in the people who worked for him and who were involved in disclosing the name of a CIA operative. Asked about that during a wide-ranging news conference, the president gave a dodgy answer.

Bush to Miers: Just say ‘no’ to Congress

President Bush ordered former Counsel Harriet Miers to defy a congressional subpoena and refuse to testify about the firings of federal prosecutors, even as a second former aide revealed new details Wednesday about White House involvement in the dismissals.

The possibility of contempt of Congress citations against both women hung over the developments.

Bush aide will stonewall Congress

President Bush’s former political director says she intends to follow his directive and not answer questions about her role in the administration’s firing of federal prosecutors — unless a court directs her to defy her former boss.

Bush postures while Americans die

With his failed Iraq policy crumbling around him, an embattled President George W. Bush Tuesday pleaded for more time from a growing list of Republican dissenters, a skeptical Democratic Congress and a disillusioned American public.

As Bush stubbornly claims his lost war can still be won, more Americans and Iraqis died in an attack inside the heavily-fortified Green Zone and a roadside bomb today destroyed a military Hummer, killing or wounding an undisclosed number of soldiers.

Gonzales knew about FBI abuses

Democrats raised new questions Tuesday about whether Attorney General Alberto Gonzales knew about FBI abuses of civil liberties when he told a Senate committee that no such problems occurred.

Lying to Congress is a crime, but it wasn’t clear if Gonzales knew about the violations when he made his statements to the Senate Intelligence Committee.

One Democrat called for a special counsel to investigate. President Bush continued to support his longtime friend.

“He still has faith in the attorney general,” White House spokesman Scott Stanzel told reporters.

Bush’s missed opportunities

On July Fourth, President Bush predictably gave another spirited defense of staying the course in Iraq, and he asked every American to find a way to thank the men and women in the military and their families.

Send a care package, he said. Ask family members with a mom or dad on the front lines what they need, carpool, pray for soldiers and their families, click on AmericaSupportsYou.mil.

Wait a minute. Did he say “carpool”? Carpooling to thank and support the troops? That’s a surprise.

Gonzales lied about Patriot Act abuse

Attorney General Alberto Gonzales lied to Congress two years ago when he claimed he there were no documented FBI abuses under the controversial USA Patriot Act.

Gonzales told Congress in April 2005 that “there has not been one verified case of civil liberties abuse” under the rights-robbing act that was passed by a shell-shocked Congress after the 9/11 terrorist attacks.

In fact, reports The Washington Post, Gonzales received at least a half-dozen reports detailing violations three months before he lied to Congress. The Post, using the Freedom of Information Act, obtained internal FBI documents detailing the violations and reports to Gonzales.

Bush to Congress: Up yours!

President Bush invoked executive privilege Monday to deny requests by Congress for testimony from two former aides about the firings of federal prosecutors.

The White House, however, did offer again to make former counsel Harriet Miers and one-time political director Sara Taylor available for private, off-the-record interviews.

In a letter to the heads of the House and Senate Judiciary panels, White House counsel Fred Fielding insisted that Bush was acting in good faith and refused lawmakers’ demand that the president explain the basis for invoking the privilege.