White House

Bush signs war-funding bill

President Bush (AP)President Bush signed a bill Friday to pay for military operations in Iraq after a bitter struggle with Democrats in Congress who sought unsuccessfully to tie the money to U.S. troop withdrawals.

Bush signed the bill into law at the Camp David presidential retreat in Maryland, where he is spending part of the Memorial Day weekend. In announcing the signing, White House spokesman Tony Fratto noted that it came 109 days after Bush sent his emergency spending request to Congress.

Memo to Jimmy Carter: Pound nails, not Bush

Of all the criticisms Jimmy Carter shouldn't be making, the allegation about President Bush's foreign policy shortcomings tops the list. He should not need to be reminded that it was his botching of the Iranian hostage situation that helped get us where we are today.

Goodling admits breaking law; says McNulty lied

Monica Goodling (AP)A former Justice Department official told House investigators Wednesday that Attorney General Alberto Gonzales tried to review his version of the prosecutor firings with her at a time when lawmakers were homing in on conflicting accounts.

"It made me a little uncomfortable," Monica Goodling, Gonzales' former White House liaison, said of her conversation with the attorney general just before she took a leave of absence in March. "I just did not know if it was appropriate for us to both be discussing our recollections of what had happened."

In a daylong appearance before the Democratic-led House Judiciary Committee, Goodling, 33, also acknowledged crossing a legal line herself by considering the party affiliations of candidates for career prosecutor jobs — a violation of law.

Accepting Bush as a monumental failure

President Bush (AP)Today we are news-trackers, hot on the trail of tomorrow's Page One, prime-time news.

And it appears that tomorrow's news may be a glimmer of good news at last for conservative Republicans who have been bitterly disappointed with what they concede, mostly in private, but occasionally in public, is the overwhelming failure of the Bush presidency: The misconduct of the Iraq war, a series of political and intelligence leadership blunders that has trapped America's brave, volunteer military in a combat mission that is not yet lost, but may never be won.

Only one way to solve the Alberto problem

Alberto GonzalesThe White House had hoped that if it dug in long enough the public controversy over Attorney General Alberto Gonzales' tenure at the Justice Department would blow over. It hasn't, and it's not going to.

Instead of waning, the calls for his resignation are intensifying. Five Republican senators have urged him to go, and Senate GOP leader Mitch McConnell was conspicuously noncommittal about whether the attorney general should stay or go.

Bush, Carter back off sniping at each other

Former President CarterPresident George W. Bush brushed off criticism on Monday of his foreign policy from former President Jimmy Carter even as Carter tried to roll back on some of his comments.

At a joint news conference with NATO Secretary-General Jaap de Hoop Scheffer at his Texas ranch, Bush said criticism like Carter's was "just part of what happens when you're president," but made clear he disagreed with the Democrat.

Bush doesn’t budge on Gonzales support

President Bush & Alberto GonzalesPresident George W. Bush on Monday accused Democrats in Congress who are seeking no-confidence votes on Attorney General Alberto Gonzales of engaging in "pure political theater."

Brushing aside concerns from Republicans as well as Democrats about the effectiveness of the chief U.S. law enforcement officer, Bush said: "He has got my confidence. He has done nothing wrong."

Bush’s last-ditch war czar

The recent appointment of Lt. Gen. Douglas Lute as the new White House overseer of operations in Iraq and Afghanistan is clearly a last-ditch effort to salvage the situation in Iraq by taking some of the control out of Pentagon hands.

Bush on Carter: ‘Increasingly irrelevant’

In a biting rebuke, the White House on Sunday dismissed former President Jimmy Carter as "increasingly irrelevant" after his harsh criticism of President Bush.

Carter was quoted Saturday as saying "I think as far as the adverse impact on the nation around the world, this administration has been the worst in history."

Is Gonzales headed for the door?

President Bush & AG GonzalesThe top Republican on the Senate committee investigating Attorney General Alberto Gonzales said Sunday he believes Gonzales could step down before a no-confidence vote sought this week by Senate Democrats.

Gonzales failed to draw a public statement of support from Senate GOP leader Mitch McConnell. Asked whether Gonzales effectively can lead the Justice Department, McConnell said "that's for the president to decide." The senator suggested there may be several resolutions introduced to dilute a no-confidence vote.

"In the Senate, nobody gets a clear shot," said McConnell, R-Ky.

Yet Pennsylvania Sen. Arlen Specter, the ranking Republican on the Senate Judiciary Committee, said he believed a "sizable number" of GOP lawmakers would join Democrats in expressing their lack of confidence in the attorney general.