White House

Stopping free speech

The White House is so worried that the increasing number of protestors who show up at Presidential events might intrude on the delusional world of George W. Bush that they have a manual that details how to keep dissent away from the President.

It even details how to throw dissenters out of Presidential rallies.

Is Bush above the law?

President George W. Bush has long believed he and those who work for him are above the law and not subject to the rules that govern the rest of America.

And that is exactly what the Justice Department is arguing in its latest claim that records in the White House Office of Administration are not subject to the Freedom of Information Act.

At issue is whether or not the law can ever be used to force the Bush Administration to be open and honest with the American people.

Judge orders White House to release reports

A federal judge ordered the Bush administration to issue two scientific reports on global warming, siding with environmentalists who sued the White House for failing to produce the documents.

U.S. District Court Judge Saundra Armstrong ruled Tuesday that the Bush administration had violated a 1990 law when it failed to meet deadlines for an updated U.S. climate change research plan and impact assessment.

Bush claims history will exonerate him

President George W. Bush claims history will prove him right on the Iraq war. The test of time, he says, will show the war as necessary in his so-called war on terrorism.

Bush evens uses Vietnam as a comparison, saying we were proven right there as well. That, some would argue, is rewriting history in real time.

And historians say what history will prove about Iraq is what most Americans now believe: That Bush’s failed war will go down as the biggest foreign policy screw up in modern times is not all time.

For Bush to believe otherwise is the height of delusion by a delusional President.

Bush abandons benchmarks for Iraq

President George W. Bush on Saturday praised what he called “progress and reconciliation” achieved in some Iraqi communities, but pointedly avoided using US government-approved benchmarks in assessing the situation in the country.

“Americans can be encouraged by the progress and reconciliation that are taking place at the local level,” Bush said in his weekly radio address that came less than a month ahead of a crucial review of US military operations Iraq.

Bush claims success in Iraq

President Bush said Saturday that while political progress is moving too slowly on the national level in Iraq, positive steps in cities and towns are offering hope for future stability.

The Bush administration, facing a mid-September deadline to report to Congress on progress in Iraq, has long prodded the Iraqi government to finalize a national oil law, organize provincial elections and integrate former members of Saddam Hussein’s Baathist Party back into the central government.

Tony Snow plans to leave White House

White House spokesman Tony Snow plans to leave his job before U.S. President George W. Bush’s term ends in January 2009, citing financial reasons rather than his recurrence of colon cancer.

In a radio interview this week, Snow, 52, did not reveal when he would leave. Snow earlier this year suffered a return of colon cancer and has been receiving chemotherapy.

But he said his reasons for leaving would be financial. He took a pay cut to leave Fox News.

The vacationer-in-chief

Recently Trent Lott, the Senate Republican whip, ominously advised his colleagues as they were debating terrorism issues that now was a good time to get out of Washington.

“I think it would be good to leave town in August, and it would probably be good to stay out until September the 12th,” he said, and then quickly left on vacation.

He didn’t say why the 12th particularly, but there’s nothing like an unspecified terrorist threat to make those of us who live here start thinking about our own vacations, even though August is an improbable time for a terrorist attack.

U.S. Satellites will spy on Americans

The United States is expanding the use of spy satellites for domestic surveillance, turning its “eyes in sky” inward to counter terrorism and eventually for law enforcement, US officials said Wednesday.

Authorized by US intelligence chief Michael McConnell in May and managed by the Department of Homeland Security, the change will allow more federal and local agencies to tap into satellite imagery and related intelligence products, they said.

It also will expand the kind of intelligence that can be made available to include measurement and signature intelligence, which is used to identify and track targets by their particular physical characteristics, they said.

Bush’s risky strategy on Iran

The Bush administration is taking a calculated risk with its plans to designate Iran’s Revolutionary Guard Corps a global terrorist organization. Tehran is certain to see it as a direct challenge to the clerical regime since it’s the Guards who keep it in power and indeed produced Iran’s current president..

The administration hopes that upping the ante and a stronger U.N. resolution banning travel by Iran’s leaders and cutting off access to the international financial system will persuade the Iranians to give up their nuclear-weapons ambitions.