White House

Dems blast Bush over Iraq funding

Democratic leaders warned Wednesday that Congress must stop writing “blank checks” for the Iraq war, after a report said the White House would request an extra 50 billion dollars in funding.

The Pentagon however said the report by the Washington Post that President George W. Bush could seek to take spending on the Iraq and Afghan wars to three billion dollars a week, was “premature.”

Democratic leaders have tried and failed to use past emergency funding bills for the war to force Bush to accept troop withdrawal timetables.

What will George do after 2008?

I have always wondered what President Bush will do after he finishes his second term, assuming that he consents to go. He could be a professional brush clearer, a producer of exercise-bike videos or a private elocution teacher for would-be politicians who need to mangle their sentences in order to achieve the common touch.

Bush plays the nuclear card

US President George W. Bush on Tuesday raised the specter of a “nuclear holocaust” in the Middle East if Israel’s arch-foe Iran gets atomic weapons, and demanded that Tehran end support for extremists in Iraq.

“Iran’s actions threaten the security of nations everywhere, and the United States is rallying friends and allies to isolate Iran’s regime, to impose economic sanctions,” he told the American Legion veterans group.

Impeachment may be the solution

President Bush is, quite reasonably, appealing to history to salvage his legacy since his prospects don’t look good in the short term. Despite current efforts to put the best possible face on conditions in Iraq, the news continues to be bad.

For example, last week, one day’s news reported the assassinations of two Iraqi governors, as well as the admission by U.S. Ambassador Ryan Crocker that southern Iraq was plagued by “a lot of violence.” In northern Iraq, a truck bomber killed 45 people, and others died elsewhere.

The Gonzales feeding frenzy

Alberto Gonzales is resigning as U.S. attorney general, and here is what critics of all stripes are saying: He was blindly, brainlessly loyal to President Bush, gave atrocious advice, was an incompetent managerial mangler and klutzy in his own self-defense.

His legacy includes a Department of Justice that’s demoralized and in disarray, argue some detractors who also aver his mistakes have been grievous to the point of costing him any hope that history will someday trot to his reputation’s rescue.

Alberto gets the hint

It seemed as if Alberto Gonzales was the last person in Washington to realize that his resignation as U.S. attorney general was both inevitable and overdue.

His credibility with Congress was shot and even fellow Republicans made no secret of their relief at his departure. Going back to his days as White House legal counsel, he was associated with a lengthening list of Bush administration legal missteps — the ill-fated military commissions, opting out of the Geneva Conventions, the terror memos, the rationalization of extra-constitutional powers for the president.

Attorney General Gonzales resigns

Attorney General Alberto Gonzales said he would resign Monday, after a scandal-tainted tenure marred by critics’ claims he was incompetent, hid the truth and may be guilty of perjury.

Gonzales, an architect of contentious US “war on terror” legal tactics, was also at the center of a row over firings of federal prosecutors, was the target of a barrage from Democrats and lost the confidence of many top Republicans.

He was the latest confidant to leave President George W. Bush, 17 months before the US leader himself exits the White House after his second term.

Bush: ‘Just give my Iraq war more time’

President George W. Bush insisted Saturday his new war strategy in Iraq showed promise but needed more time to bear fruit as the White House fought to rebuff calls for a withdrawal of US troops.

“We are still in the early stages of our new operations,” Bush said in his weekly radio address. “But the success of the past couple of months have shown that conditions on the ground can change — and they are changing.”

In a clear jab at critics demanding a drawdown of US troops, Bush added: “We cannot expect the new strategy we are carrying out to bring success overnight.”

A comparison of conveniece

Throughout the war in Iraq, President Bush has firmly dismissed comparisons with Vietnam, and his aides were careful not to mention that still-raw conflict in defending his policies.

Just don’t quote me

Bush administration political appointees have a proven track record of meddling in the work of the government’s career appointees, suppressing findings that conflict with GOP dogma and rewriting reports that might upset the party’s socially conservative base.

They seem to have surpassed themselves over at the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, which does the laudable work of researching ways to keep Americans from getting killed in their cars.