White House

Bush used analysts as propaganda tool

The administration of President George W. Bush has manipulated military analysts working for leading US television networks to generate favorable coverage of the war in Iraq and other issues, The New York Times reported on its website Saturday.

Bush’s failed Iraq war: ‘A major debacle’

In a scathing analysis, a former senior Pentagon official has called the war in Iraq “a major debacle” that created an incubator for terrorism and emboldened Iran.

“Measured in blood and treasure, the war in Iraq has achieved the status of a major war and a major debacle,” Joseph Collins wrote in “Choosing War: The Decision to Invade Iraq and its Aftermath.”

Old arguments, new excuses

In his address following two days of congressional testimony by the top two American officials in Iraq, President Bush indicated that there would be no let-up in his determination to prosecute the war for the remainder of his term. He also advanced a different rationale for fighting the war.

Bush freezing Iraq troop levels

President George W. Bush on Thursday ordered an indefinite halt to US troop withdrawals from Iraq come July, warning that the strife-torn country remains too fragile five years after Baghdad fell.

Maybe our Presidents should be better paid

If the presidency is worth so much after one leaves the White House, why is it worth so little during time in office when the occupant has the active management of the largest corporation in the world? That rate, $400,000 annually, is so low for the immense responsibility as to be embarrassing if not insulting.

Few Hispanics support Bush’s war

As eventually happened with Vietnam, U.S. military involvement in Iraq is pulling Hispanics in two directions. Maybe three.

Numbers tell some of the story. The latest Pew Hispanic Center poll found less than a quarter of Latinos (24 percent) support U.S. troop participation. That’s down from 31 percent in 2006 and 39 percent in 2004.

Dick Cheney’s arrogance

It’s a good thing this exchange between Vice President Cheney and ABC News reporter Martha Raddatz took place in Oman, out of reach of the American public.

Raddatz observed of the 5-year-old Iraq war, “Two-thirds of Americans say it’s not worth fighting, and they’re looking at the value gain versus the cost in American lives, certainly, and Iraqi lives.”

And Cheney’s response: “So?”