White House

Maybe our Presidents should be better paid

If the presidency is worth so much after one leaves the White House, why is it worth so little during time in office when the occupant has the active management of the largest corporation in the world? That rate, $400,000 annually, is so low for the immense responsibility as to be embarrassing if not insulting.

Few Hispanics support Bush’s war

As eventually happened with Vietnam, U.S. military involvement in Iraq is pulling Hispanics in two directions. Maybe three.

Numbers tell some of the story. The latest Pew Hispanic Center poll found less than a quarter of Latinos (24 percent) support U.S. troop participation. That’s down from 31 percent in 2006 and 39 percent in 2004.

Dick Cheney’s arrogance

It’s a good thing this exchange between Vice President Cheney and ABC News reporter Martha Raddatz took place in Oman, out of reach of the American public.

Raddatz observed of the 5-year-old Iraq war, “Two-thirds of Americans say it’s not worth fighting, and they’re looking at the value gain versus the cost in American lives, certainly, and Iraqi lives.”

And Cheney’s response: “So?”

Bush’s legacy: An America in decline

President Bush’s unilateral decision to invade Iraq five years ago has not only cost America power, influence and prestige but has also plunged the nation into economic chaos and left America with lagging morale and hope for the future.

That’s the conclusion of an increasing number of bipartisan observers, backed by surveys, studies and examinations of a nation in trouble.

Bush watered down smog rules

The Environmental Protection Agency agreed to weaken a key section of its new smog requirements announced this week after being told at the last minute that President Bush preferred a less stringent approach, according to government documents.

Bush will veto anti-waterboarding bill

President Bush is poised to veto legislation that would bar the CIA from using waterboarding — a technique that simulates drowning — and other harsh interrogation methods on terror suspects.

The president planned to talk about the veto in his Saturday radio address.

Bush has said the bill would harm the government’s ability to prevent future attacks. Supporters of the legislation argue that it preserves the United States’ right to collect critical intelligence while boosting the country’s moral standing abroad.

“The bill would take away one of the most valuable tools on the war on terror, the CIA program to detain and question key terrorist leaders and operatives,” deputy White House press secretary Tony Fratto said Friday.