White House

Obama, Bush meet today

Less than one week after his historic victory, U.S. President-elect Barack Obama heads to Washington on Monday to learn firsthand from President George W. Bush about the challenges that await him on January 20.

Obama, 47, who swept to office after two years of campaigning on a theme of change — particularly from Bush’s economic and foreign policies — will put politics aside as he visits the White House.

Bush approved more covert raids

The U.S. military has conducted nearly a dozen secret operations against al-Qaida and other terrorist groups in Syria, Pakistan and other countries since 2004, The New York Times reported Sunday night.

Citing anonymous U.S. officials, the Times story said the operations were authorized by a broad classified order that then-Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld signed and President Bush approved in spring 2004. The order gave the military authority to attack al-Qaida anywhere in the world and to conduct operations in countries that were not at war with the U.S.

Judge to Bush: Produce wiretap memos

A judge has ordered the Justice Department to produce White House memos that provide the legal basis for the Bush administration’s post-Sept. 11 warrantless wiretapping program.

And where’s George W. Bush these days?

The unpopular President Bush is staying off the campaign trail in the race to succeed him.

The president is raising money. But for voters in the swing states that count — Florida and Ohio, for example — Bush is the invisible incumbent. With a mere 26 percent approval rating, Bush was expected to keep a low profile in John McCain’s campaign. As it turns out, Bush has been a virtual no-show — except in Democratic television ads that regularly tie him to Republican candidates.

Bush leaves next President a world of trouble

US President George W. Bush’s successor inherits a world of troubles come January, including wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, a defiant Iran, and a US economy battered by the global financial crisis.

The new president will take the reins of a limping superpower facing deep doubts overseas about the limits of its strength, and sharply diminished US standing even among Washington’s closest friends, recent studies find.

Bush approved CIA torture program

The Bush administration explicitly endorsed the use of waterboarding and other harsh interrogation methods against al Qaeda suspects in a pair of secret memos to the CIA in 2003 and 2004, The Washington Post reported on Wednesday.

So much for the Bush legacy

So you’re a federal employee sitting in your cubicle pondering the smoldering ruins of your retirement portfolio when you receive an interdepartmental memo asking you to list your agency’s major accomplishments over the past eight years for something the White House is compiling called "The Bush Record."

A rare victory for Bush

The Senate has handed President Bush probably the last foreign policy victory of his presidency, easily approving, 86-13, a measure to end a 34-year ban on nuclear trade with India. The House had earlier approved it, 298-117.

As easy a sell as it was here, the agreement almost brought down the government of India because its prickly nationalist and communist parties insisted that its requirement that India’s civilian nuclear program be open to international monitoring impinged on national sovereignty.

Bush’s vanishing clout

George W. Bush’s public humiliation at the hands of his own party showcases the lack of clout left for America’s most unpopular President in history as he heads into the waning days of his failed Presidency.

With the White House scrambling to salvage its controversial, $750 billion bailout plan before the nation plunges headlong into a depression, the President finds himself a pariah within his own party.

Meanwhile, his public popularity, already at an all-time low, continues to slide.

To hell with Bush’s bailout

It is beyond irritating to watch President Bush, Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson, and Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke gift wrap their $700 billion early Christmas present for financially irresponsible bankers and the overleveraged borrowers who love them. These "three wise men" consider theirs the only method to stop the turmoil roiling trading desks from Gotham to Tokyo.