White House

Bush approved CIA torture program

The Bush administration explicitly endorsed the use of waterboarding and other harsh interrogation methods against al Qaeda suspects in a pair of secret memos to the CIA in 2003 and 2004, The Washington Post reported on Wednesday.

So much for the Bush legacy

So you’re a federal employee sitting in your cubicle pondering the smoldering ruins of your retirement portfolio when you receive an interdepartmental memo asking you to list your agency’s major accomplishments over the past eight years for something the White House is compiling called "The Bush Record."

A rare victory for Bush

The Senate has handed President Bush probably the last foreign policy victory of his presidency, easily approving, 86-13, a measure to end a 34-year ban on nuclear trade with India. The House had earlier approved it, 298-117.

As easy a sell as it was here, the agreement almost brought down the government of India because its prickly nationalist and communist parties insisted that its requirement that India’s civilian nuclear program be open to international monitoring impinged on national sovereignty.

Bush’s vanishing clout

George W. Bush’s public humiliation at the hands of his own party showcases the lack of clout left for America’s most unpopular President in history as he heads into the waning days of his failed Presidency.

With the White House scrambling to salvage its controversial, $750 billion bailout plan before the nation plunges headlong into a depression, the President finds himself a pariah within his own party.

Meanwhile, his public popularity, already at an all-time low, continues to slide.

To hell with Bush’s bailout

It is beyond irritating to watch President Bush, Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson, and Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke gift wrap their $700 billion early Christmas present for financially irresponsible bankers and the overleveraged borrowers who love them. These "three wise men" consider theirs the only method to stop the turmoil roiling trading desks from Gotham to Tokyo.

When all else fails, try Socialism

It was a true September Surprise. A calamitous financial crisis that not only toppled Wall Street’s corporate icons and sent global markets plummeting but may have given Barack Obama’s seemingly mired campaign the one thing he may never have secured on his own: Victory.

Americans oppose an imperial Presidency

Americans strongly oppose giving the president more power at the expense of Congress or the courts, even to enhance national security or the economy, according to a new poll.

The Associated Press-National Constitution Center poll of views on the Constitution found people wary of governmental authority after years of controversy over the Bush administration’s expansion of executive power, and especially skeptical of increasing the president’s powers.

Bush’s present to the next President

President Bush might have been temped to announce a dramatic drawdown of U.S. troops as a way of declaring victory in Iraq as he is on his way out of office. Whatever happened next would be his successor’s headache.

Bush plans pullout of 8,000 troops

President Bush plans to pull 8,000 more combat and support troops out of Iraq by February, a measured drawdown that will leave nearly the same level of U.S. forces in the war zone for the rest of the year.

Bush’s decision, to be delivered in a speech Tuesday, is perhaps his final stamp on the war that has defined his presidency. The scope and pace of the U.S. troop withdrawals are smaller than long anticipated, reflecting a desire by the military and the president not to jeopardize security gains in Iraq.

By the time the troops return home on the timeline Bush is proposing, someone else will be making the wartime decisions from the Oval Office.