November 19, 2017 | In times of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act.
Sunday, November 19, 2017
042207iraq.jpgTwo suicide car bombers attacked a police station Sunday in western Baghdad, police said, killing at least 13 people and turning nearby buildings into piles of rubble. The violence underscored Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki's efforts to win Arab support for his struggling government on a four-nation tour around the region.
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The Pentagon is laying the groundwork to extend the U.S. troop buildup in Iraq. At the same time, the administration is warning Iraqi leaders that the boost in forces could be reversed if political reconciliation is not evident by summer.
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Devastated Iraqis hunted for dead relatives in city morgues on Thursday after brutal car bombings killed 190 people in Baghdad and raised questions about the US-led security plan for the capital.
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As of Monday, April 16, 2007, at least 3,308 members of the U.S. military have died since the beginning of the Iraq war in March 2003, according to an Associated Press count. The figure includes seven military civilians.
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Two car bombs exploded minutes apart in a busy Baghdad market in a mainly Shiite district Sunday, killing at least 18 people. North of the capital, two British helicopters crashed after an apparent collision in air, killing two soldiers.
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A car bomb blasted through a busy bus station near one of Iraq's holiest shrines on Saturday, killing at least 56 people, police and hospital officials said. Separately, a suicide car bomb killed 10 people on a major bridge in downtown Baghdad — the second attack on a span over the Tigris river this week, police said. The Jadriyah bridge suffered little damage.
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At least 10 died in bridge bombing (AP)
A bomb exploded in the Iraqi parliament's cafeteria in a stunning assault in the heart of the heavily fortified, U.S.-protected Green Zone Thursday, killing at least two lawmakers and wounding 10 other people.
041107iraq.jpgU.S. soldiers will serve up to 15 months in Iraq and Afghanistan instead of one year, Defense Secretary Robert Gates said on Wednesday, the latest sign of the strain the wars have placed on the U.S. military. Gates said the move would allow the military to sustain the boost in U.S. forces in Iraq, ordered by President George W. Bush in January, for about a year if desired but it was too early to say how long the increased troop levels actually would be needed.
040907soldiers.jpgWith military resources running dangerously thin, the Bush administration and the Pentagon may extend the combat tours of some 15,000 troops currently in Iraq. The news comes as notices go out to National Guard units ordering them for new deployments to Iraq. The orders increase the public's anger over an Iraq war that most military experts say cannot be won.

By LOLITA C. BALDOR

Several National Guard brigades are expected to be notified soon that they could be sent to Iraq around the first of next year, according to a senior Defense Department official.

If their assignment to Iraq is ultimately approved by Defense Secretary Robert Gates, it would be the first time full Guard combat brigades were sent back to Iraq for a second tour.