Unfiled

Agricultural terrorism

By MARTIN SCHRAM

There was no sudden explosion, no siren, no news bulletin, no screams for help.

Just people, one by one, quietly calling the doctor or going to the hospital, suffering intestinal distress. So it took a while before officials realized this was something bigger: All who were sick had recently eaten fresh leafy greens. This was food poisoning. But it would be one full year before public health officials would finally understand that it was a bio-terror attack.

The absurdity of fear

By PAUL C. CAMPOS

I’m flying for the first time since the arrest last month in London of a dozen people accused of planning to blow up several airliners, with bombs assembled onboard out of various ordinary liquids. The more I read about this plot the more amateurish and improbable it sounds, but that hasn’t discouraged the authorities from implementing a new set of rules and rituals, which will supposedly help keep us safe from terror.

White House looks for compromise on terrorist bill

By MARGARET TALEV
McClatchy Newspapers

With time running out before Congress recesses next week, the White House appeared Tuesday to be offering dissident Republican senators a compromise on detainee legislation that would leave the language of the Geneva Conventions untouched if lawmakers preserve the CIA’s terrorist-interrogation program.

Lamont: Lieberman is a ‘turncoat’

By DAVE COLLINS

Democrat Ned Lamont calls rival Sen. Joe Lieberman a "turncoat" in his latest ad.

Not so, says the three-term Democratic lawmaker running as an independent, and he has some party support in Connecticut to prove it.

The truth comes out: U.S. may send more troops to Iraq

By LOLITA C. BALDOR

The U.S. military will likely maintain or possibly even increase the current force levels of more than 140,000 troops in Iraq through next spring, the top US. commander in the Middle East said Tuesday in one of the gloomiest assessments yet of how quickly American forces can be brought home.

Bush claims America seeks peace in Mideast

By NEDRA PICKLER

President Bush tried to quell anti-Americanism in the Middle East on Tuesday by assuring Muslims that he is not waging war against Islam, regardless of what "propaganda and conspiracy theories" they hear.

Cheney continues to preach the company line

By TOM RAUM

Vice President Dick Cheney cast the global war on terror on Tuesday as a "war of nerves," borrowing a phrase Harry Truman used to describe the Cold War. Cheney asserted that the hopes of the civilized world depend on a U.S. victory.

Leave the Geneva Conventions alone

By DALE McFEATTERS

The White House insists a compromise is possible with congressional critics of its plan to explicitly authorize what it euphemistically calls "alternative" interrogation techniques, or what most people would think of as torture.