In times of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act.
Wednesday, November 22, 2017
In an ironic display of incredible political hypocrisy, President George W. Bush, the President whose administration is marked by an uncountable list of lies, is telling voters that the Democratic Party is weak-kneed on national security and shouldn't be trusted to hold the reins of Congress.
By LIZ SIDOTI

In a twist on the old Watergate question, the Republican Party is struggling to answer: What did GOP leaders know of a congressman's suggestive exchanges with former pages, all teenage males, and when did they know it?

By CAROLINE E. RUSE and JOSH SWARTZLANDER
Scripps Howard Foundation Wire

ABC News was the first traditional media outlet to report explicit instant messages between former Rep. Mark Foley, R-Fla., and under-aged congressional pages, but an Internet blog broke the story almost a week earlier.

By AMIE PARNES

Former Congressman Mark Foley is "contrite and remorseful" and sent e-mails to male teenage pages while under the influence of alcohol, but he is "absolutely, positively not a pedophile," his lawyer said Monday night.

Foley fallout continues

By THOMAS HARGROVE

The resignation of Florida Republican Rep. Mark Foley, after disclosure of his sexually explicit Internet communications with a former House page, sent shock waves through the missing-and-exploited-children community, which had once counted on Foley's support.

By THOMAS HARGROVE

Legal experts say it's unclear if former Rep. Mark Foley's explicit Internet conversation with a male teenager who had served as a congressional page could pose a violation of state or federal laws.

By LISA HOFFMAN

House Speaker Dennis Hastert came under increasing flak Monday for his handling of suggestive e-mails sent by former Florida Rep. Mark Foley, as some Republican lawmakers scrambled to ditch campaign contributions they had taken from Foley and otherwise distance themselves from the erupting scandal.

By LEE BOWMAN

The issue of who knew what and when about Rep. Mark Foley's contacts with House pages is at the crux of a still-evolving investigation and political storm engulfing Republican leaders.

By BOB LEWIS

Sen. George Allen attempted to steer his campaign away from accusations of racial insensitivity Monday night with a two-minute, statewide television ad touting the need to focus on "the real issues," such as support for U.S. troops in Iraq.

By DAN K. THOMASSON

Here's one for you: Two terrorists are walking up the street, having just arrived in America. One begins chattering in Arabic, only to be remonstrated by his frightened companion that this is the United States, "Do you want to get caught? Speak Spanish."