Archives for Politics

Not much demand for Obama on campaign trail

President Barack Obama is picking some temperate spots in an otherwise chilly political landscape, avoiding hostile Senate terrain during the final days of the midterm campaign in favor of tight governor races where his liabilities are less likely to stick to Democratic candidates. With a week left before Election Day, Obama is fanning out to campaign in six states, betting that his last-minute appeals will mobilize core Democratic voters who have a history of sitting out midterm elections. For Democrats and for the White House, it’s the strategy with the lowest risk. Each of the states — Wisconsin, Michigan, Maine,
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Is another Bush ready for a White House run?

Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush is “moving forward” on a potential 2016 White House run and it appears more likely he will enter the Republican field, according to his son, who’s running for office in Texas. George P. Bush told ABC’s “This Week” that his father is “still assessing” a presidential bid, but suggested it was more likely that he would seek the White House this time. The ex-governor declined to run for president in 2012 despite encouragement from Republicans. “I think it’s more than likely that he’s giving this a serious thought and moving — and moving forward,” said
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Christie claims he’s a good contrast to Obama

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie presented himself in sharp contrast to President Barack Obama in a fiery speech that sounded like the early makings of a presidential pitch. Speaking from an Iowa stage to an audience that included some of the early voting state’s top powerbrokers, Christie painted the picture of a country hungry for leadership and a world adrift, with a feckless White House to blame. “America used to control events both here at home and around the world. And now it seems that our fate is being dictated to us by others,” Christie said Saturday, bemoaning what he
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Early voting trends bring campaign adjustments

For over 1 million Californians, the Nov. 4 election is over. That’s because they’ve already voted. A growing throng of early voters in the nation’s most populous state — perhaps comprising half of all votes to be cast in California’s general election — has stretched Election Day into weeks. Candidates who wait until the end to close the deal with voters will be too late. “The election is not a one-day event anymore. It’s a 30-day event,” said veteran Democratic strategist Bill Carrick, who is spearheading Kennedy clan member Bobby Shriver’s campaign for Los Angeles County supervisor. The midterm elections
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Can Democrats regain votes outside of cities?

In an arena usually reserved for rodeos and livestock shows, Democratic Senate candidate Michelle Nunn told a boisterous crowd she was “glad to be home.” Her Republican opponent in the Georgia race, David Perdue, stood on the same debate stage and bellowed, “Welcome to Perdue country.” Neither candidate lives near the fairgrounds, much less among cattle or row crops. Nunn is a nonprofit executive who resides in a liberal neighborhood near downtown Atlanta, while Perdue is a wealthy former corporate CEO who lives behind multiple gates on a coastal island. But both candidates spent their formative years in middle Georgia,
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The pesky seas of campaign signs of the times

Pesky. Illegal. Effective? Lawn signs touting local and statewide candidates are in full bloom along highways, street corners and other public spaces. It’s the sign of the season. And despite legal restrictions, the markers can sprout invasively. Campaigns hope voters see them as a signal of the community’s support for the candidate or issue. But repeat exposure can rub some the wrong way. “They just mushroom,” said Elizabeth Lessner, a central Ohio restaurateur. “It used to be they put one sign on the corner and now there’s 50.” Lessner is one of the Columbus Sign Ninjas, a group that sprang
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North Carolina Senate race: A choice of extremes

North Carolina’s Senate race boils down to a battle of extremes. At least that’s how Democratic Sen. Kay Hagan and Republican challenger Thom Tillis want voters to see it. Running against President Barack Obama as much as he is against Hagan, Tillis calls the president’s health care law an “unworkable mess,” blasts American foreign policy as muddled and weak, and bemoans a $17 trillion-plus national debt. “Kay Hagan’s gone to Washington and voted with President Obama 96 percent of the time,” Tillis, 54, says, urging voters to make Hagan answer for “the failures of this administration.” But Hagan, 61, has
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Corporate giants fund ballot initiatives

Voters may not know it, but the millions of dollars paying for ads on ballot measures they will consider next month come from large companies and national advocacy groups. Many of the messages are tailored to defend or expand the business interests of companies such as Coca-Cola, Monsanto and ExxonMobil, yet few have their names in the ads. For example, $6.4 million in ads funded by Coloradans for Better Schools is backed by the Rhode Island-based Twin Rivers Casino in favor of a ballot initiative that would expand gambling to horse tracks. Opponents, calling themselves Don’t Turn Racetracks Into Casinos,
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Polls favor Republicans to run Congress

Two weeks before Election Day, most of the nation’s likely voters now expect the Republican Party to take control of the U.S. Senate, according to a new Associated Press-GfK poll. And by a growing margin, they say that’s the outcome they’d like to see. But the survey suggests many will cringe when they cast those ballots. Most likely voters have a negative impression of the Republican Party, and 7 in 10 are dissatisfied by its leaders in Congress. The Democrats win few accolades themselves. Impressions of the party among likely voters have grown more negative in the past month. In
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Obama’s bittersweet visit home

A lesson from President Barack Obama’s brief trip home, straight out of Shakespeare: What’s past is prologue. While his trip to Chicago offered a sweet taste of nostalgia, it also offered reminders that his efforts in the first six years of his presidency have set the stage for immense challenges in his final two years. Everywhere he went, Obama got glimpses of a simpler time when his life was for the most part, normal: the unpaid bills on his desk, the volunteers who pitched in on his first Senate campaign, the day he marched in seven Fourth of July parades.
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