Archives for Politics

White mayor, black wife: Big news in politics today

Another milestone is passing in America’s racial journey: The next mayor of New York City is a white man with a black wife. Even in a nation with a biracial president, where interracial marriage is more accepted and common than ever, Bill de Blasio‘s marriage to Chirlane McCray is remarkable: He is apparently the first white politician in U.S. history elected to a major office with a black spouse by his side. This simple fact is striking a deep chord in many people as de Blasio prepares to take office on Jan. 1, with McCray playing a major role in
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Republicans see health care debacle as 2014 opportunity

In his West Virginia district, the TV ads attacking Democratic Rep. Nick Rahall over the calamitous startup of President Barack Obama’s health care law have already begun. The 19-term veteran, a perennial target in a GOP-shifting state, is among many in the president’s party who have recited to constituents Obama’s assurance that they could keep insurance coverage they liked under the 2010 overhaul. That has proved untrue for several million Americans, igniting a public uproar that has forced Obama to reverse himself on part of the law and sent many Democrats scrambling into political self-preservation mode ahead of next year’s
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Rubio returning to right where he left off

Stung by conservative backlash earlier this year, Marco Rubio has spent months seemingly trying to convince skeptical fellow Republicans that he’s more than just the Florida senator who championed comprehensive immigration reform. He joined the drive to defund President Barack Obama’s health care law, though his voice grew softer as the resulting government shutdown and his party sank in polls. He then turned to championing social issues like legislative prayer. On Saturday, Rubio will deliver the keynote address at a fundraiser for the Florida Family Policy Council, an evangelical group that led the successful 2008 effort to ban gay marriage
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Bill Clinton leading Democrats demanding Obamacare changes

The growing pressure on President Barack Obama to adjust his problem-plagued healthcare law seemed to boil over on Tuesday, as leaders of Obama’s Democratic Party called on him to allow a change in the law so that Americans who are happy with their health plans could keep them. In what became the clearest sign yet of Democrats’ increasing anxiety over the troubled rollout of the healthcare law, former President Bill Clinton told the web magazine Ozymandias that Obama should support such a change to fulfill a promise he and his administration have made to Americans for years. “I personally believe,
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Typical Republican attitude: What, me worry?

As a Republican, freshman Rep. Ted Yoho of Florida cares about the Republican Party’s image and fate. But what he especially cares about is a tiny sliver of the GOP: about 22,000 primary voters who lean heavily conservative and who secured his spot in the House. Yoho is hardly alone. Many other House Republicans owe their elections to similarly small and ideologically intense electorates. These GOP lawmakers pay far less attention to the party’s national reputation. And that deeply frustrates activists trying to build broad, national coalitions to elect a Republican as president in 2016 and beyond. Yoho and his
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Palin pontificates on Christie but offers nothing of value

Sarah Palin, a political accident who failed as governor of Alaska, self-destructed as a Republican vice presidential candidate and hasn’t held a steady job in months is now passing herself off as an expert on who should or should not be the Republican presidential candidate in 2016. Appearing on Monday on the Today Show — which apparently had a shortage of available fact-based guests on the Veterans Day holiday — Palin shied away from saying anything substantive about New Jersey GOP Governor Chris Christie — who dominated his re-election campaign last week with a 62 percent victory in a Democratic
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Christie to GOP: Reach out to minorities, women, seniors

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, heralded as the “proper face of the Republican Party” after his 22 percent re-election win last week, has a simple message for the GOP:  Walk away from the right-wing extremists, spend more time with women, seniors and minorities plus shut up and listen to voters. And what about 2016, when Republicans will need a more centrist-focused nominee for President to try and reverse losses in the last two elections? “I know everybody is going to be speculating about what may come in my future and lots other people’s future in our party,” Christie said on
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Chris Christie after re-election: Onwards and upwards

A dominant re-election victory in hand, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie is pursuing a path to bolster his resume as a get-it-done Republican leader and to broaden a national network of political allies. This aggressive course is designed to strengthen his appeal as he considers whether to run for president in 2016. Christie faces stubborn skeptics on all sides, even though he won a second term Tuesday by 22 percentage points. Democrats who control the New Jersey Legislature are questioning his second-term priorities. Some conservative activists in important presidential primary states remain outright hostile to the Republican politician who embraced
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Voters fed up but not giving up yet

If there’s one word that describes how Americans feel about politics these days, it’s “negative.” Majorities disapprove of Congress and the president and say the nation is heading in the wrong direction. Few trust their political leaders to make the right decisions, and some polls suggest voters would like to see the whole lot turned out next November. Yet an Associated Press-GfK poll in October found more people tuning in to politics — warts and all — than tuning out. It’s not a major election year, so day-to-day interest in following news about politics and elections was lower than at
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Pragmatism and reality won big on election night

Electability and pragmatism won. Ideology and purity lost. In Democratic-leaning New Jersey, voters gave Republican Chris Christie a second term and rewarded him for his bipartisan, get-it-done, inclusive pitch. In swing state Virginia, voters narrowly rejected Republican Ken Cuccinelli‘s uncompromising, conservative approach. If there’s a lesson from Tuesday’s off-year elections, it might be that during a time of deep divisions within the Republican Party, staunchly conservative GOP candidates who press ideological positions have difficulty winning general elections in competitive states. Candidates with mainstream appeal like Christie in New Jersey and Democrat Terry McAuliffe in Virginia can overcome obstacles that might
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