Archives for Politics

Can three gay Republicans make election history?

Dan Innis’ husband persuaded him to run for the U.S. House. It didn’t matter that Innis, a former business school dean, faced an aggressive Democratic incumbent, GOP colleagues who oppose his right to marry, and history — no Republican ever has been openly gay when first elected to Congress. “He said, ‘You’ve got to do this,'” recalls Innis, running in the 1st Congressional District, which covers most of eastern New Hampshire. “He said, ‘You need to take this opportunity and see if you can make a difference.'” Innis plays down his sexuality as a campaign issue, but acknowledges the historic
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Documentary found Romney a ‘cheap’ candidate

Former Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney may be a very wealthy man but when a filmmaker decided to document his two failed White House bids over six years, he was surprised to find how thrifty the former private equity executive was. “I was surprised that somebody that rich would be that cheap,” director Greg Whiteley told Reuters, regaling a story of how Romney was shocked at the price of a glass of milk at a hotel. “He was constantly agonizing over how much for a (campaign advertising) spot.” Romney, who left the private equity firm Bain Capital he co-founded to
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Will GOP donors stick with Chris Christie?

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie faces one of his first major tests since his backyard political scandal erupted: reassuring top Republican donors that he has taken steps to address allegations of political payback in his home state and that he remains a viable presidential contender for the party’s establishment. Christie, who leads the Republican Governors Association, will travel to Florida this weekend for a series of fundraisers to help Republican Gov. Rick Scott. It will be his first out-of-state trip since the scandal involving lane closures at the George Washington Bridge escalated. The itinerary listing some of Florida’s most exclusive
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McAuliffe becomes Virginia’s new governor

Terry McAuliffe, the former Democratic National Committee chairman and rainmaker for Bill and Hillary Clinton, was sworn in as Virginia’s 72nd governor on a mild and rainy Saturday. In an inaugural address on the south portico of the state Capitol designed by Thomas Jefferson, McAuliffe emphasized bipartisanship as he put several years of campaigning behind him to begin the more challenging task of leading a politically divided government. Republicans have firm control of the House of Delegates, while the outcome of two special elections will determine control of the Senate. “Common ground doesn’t move towards us, we move towards it,”
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GOP thinks it can remake itself into a party that helps the poor

Faced with an empathy gap before the 2014 midterm elections, Republicans are trying to forge a new image as a party that helps the poor and lifts struggling workers into the middle class. GOP leaders are using the 50th anniversary of President Lyndon B. Johnson‘s War on Poverty to offer a series of policy proposals that would shift anti-poverty programs to the states, promote job training and offer tax incentives for low-income workers. The effort aims to offer an alternative to President Barack Obama’s economic agenda and shed the baggage of Mitt Romney’s 2012 presidential bid, which was hurt by
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Liz Cheney drops out of Wyoming Senate race

Liz Cheney, daughter of former Vice President Dick Cheney, on Monday abruptly abandoned her effort to unseat Republican incumbent Sen. Mike Enzi of Wyoming. Cheney cited “serious health issues” that “have recently arisen in our family” as the reason for her decision. But her candidacy had raised hackles in the Republican Party and caused a public rift with her sister, Mary, a lesbian, over Liz Cheney’s opposition to gay marriage. In her withdrawal statement, Cheney did not mention those controversies. “Serious health issues have recently arisen in our family, and under the circumstances, I have decided to discontinue my campaign.
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Presidential sweepstates: Who will challenge Hillary?

For Democrats and Republicans, the early stages of the 2016 presidential contest are worlds apart. Many Democrats already view Hillary Rodham Clinton as a quasi-incumbent, someone who could take the reins from President Barack Obama. The former secretary of state has made no decisions about her political future but has done little to dampen enthusiasm about another presidential campaign, traveling the country making speeches and preparing to release another book. Republicans have no clear front-runner and expect a crowded primary field that could include fresh-faced candidates like New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul and Florida Sen. Marco
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Can a two-woman ticket win in Texas?

Forget whether Hillary Clinton could win the White House in 2016. Women still have yet to run many statehouses, but in 2014 two Texas Democrats are going for a new kind of history: Winning as an all-female ticket for governor and lieutenant governor. Woven into one of the nation’s most intriguing gubernatorial races this year is whether Democrat Wendy Davis, whose 11-hour filibuster over abortion restrictions catapulted the state senator to national fame this summer, can not only overcome long odds in a fiercely Republican state but pull off a political first. If Davis and fellow state Sen. Leticia Van
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Defining the deciding issues for elections in 2014

In a competitive district east of Denver, Democrat Andrew Romanoff is counting on voter anger at a divided and ineffectual Congress to help him unseat three-term Republican Rep. Mike Coffman. “I must have blinked and missed it,” the challenger said of the House’s work this past year. “It’s become a punch line to call this the least productive Congress in history or to joke ‘how do you tell when Congress is in session or on vacation, it’s hard to tell the difference.'” Ten months to next year’s midterm elections, Democrats are determined to make Congress’ slim production of fewer than
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Health care a dividing issue in 2014 races

Republicans see the 2014 midterm elections as a chance to capitalize on voter frustration with the problem-plagued health care overhaul, but the GOP first must settle a slate of Senate primaries where conservatives are arguing over the best way to oppose President Barack Obama’s signature law. In intraparty skirmishes from Georgia to Nebraska, the GOP’s most strident candidates and activists are insisting on a no-holds-barred approach. They accuse fellow Republicans — including several incumbent senators — of being too soft in their opposition to the Affordable Care Act and to the president in general. The outcomes will help determine just
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