November 19, 2017 | In times of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act.
Sunday, November 19, 2017

The one week countdown to the most hardfought presidential election in history gets underway Tuesday with Barack Obama and John McCain vowing to fight to the finish for every last vote.

The White House rivals were to hold competing rallies Tuesday in the rust-belt state of Pennsylvania before splitting, with Republican McCain fighting a rearguard action in North Carolina and Obama heading to Virginia.

Fading in the polls, John McCain fought Barack Obama for support in economically hard-hit Ohio on Monday, each man pledging to right the economy and turn the page on the Bush era in a state with an impressive record for picking presidents.

Eight days from the election, however, Republicans looked and sounded increasingly like a party anticipating defeat, and possibly a substantial one.

It probably wouldn't have made much difference but Sen. John McCain's chances might have improved somewhat had he focused almost exclusively on the theme of two of his recent national ads -- Sen. Barack Obama's lack of experience -- and forgone the negativism that in the end only served to energize the opposition.

Right-wing Republicans, especially on the radio, are promoting the argument that Colin Powell's endorsement of Democratic presidential nominee Barack Obama is a matter of race, since both are black. This very misguided move could transform current Republican political difficulties into Republican political disaster. Republican presidential nominee John McCain quite rightly, and wisely, disavows the ploy.

Barack Obama leads John McCain in five of eight crucial battleground states one week before the presidential election, with McCain ahead in two states and Florida dead even, according to a series of Reuters/Zogby polls released on Monday.

Before a record 100,000 plus crowd, Democratic nominee Barack Obama Sunday rebuked John McCain after his Republican foe said he shared the "philosophy" of unpopular President George W. Bush.

Just nine days before the presidential election, Obama again attempted to shackle McCain to Bush's unpopular Republican economic legacy and tried to rebut attacks on his own tax policy.

Political allegiances are as divided as football loyalties in the country's heartland, home to deeply depressed economies, middle America values and profound doubts about whether either Barack Obama or John McCain will be able to reverse the worst financial turmoil this country has seen since the Great Depression.

Barack Obama and John McCain will fight a weekend duel over states won in 2004 by President George W. Bush, a sure sign of the Democrat's edge heading into the last week of the White House race.

A heavy-hearted Obama arrived back on the US mainland in the early hours of Saturday after an emotional trip to Hawaii to visit the gravely ill grandmother who brought him up, possibly for the last time.

Republican John McCain's campaign defended vice presidential running mate Sarah Palin on Friday over a flap involving $150,000 in clothes purchased by the Republican Party for her and her family's use.

The wardrobe controversy, first reported by political news website Politico, has been used by some critics to try to undercut Palin's image as a down-to-earth working mother who touts her small town values.

First there was Joe the Plumber. Is Joe the Hothead next? Joe McCain said Friday he'll withdraw from campaign activities for his brother, GOP presidential nominee John McCain, after calling 911 to angrily complain about traffic. Joe McCain has apologized for making the call.