Archives for Politics

Most Republicans stay mum on prize

While top conservative media personalities and Republican National Committee Chairman Michael Steele were quick to disparage Friday's surprise awarding of the Nobel Peace Prize to President Barack Obama, the response from other corners of the GOP was considerably more muted. From the field of prospective 2012 presidential contenders to Capitol Hill, most Republican voices were careful to offer faint praise-or simply to keep their mouths shut. It was the rare occasion when many of the party's most prominent voices could agree that the most effective political response was none at all. The thinking was that there was little need to pile on since the decision to present the award- for which Obama was nominated within his first two weeks in office-seemed to speak volumes on its own.
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GOP candidates shun help from Palin

Sarah Palin stands ready to stump for the Republican gubernatorial candidates running in the two most closely-watched campaigns in the country this fall, but neither seems to want her help. Less than a month before voters go to the polls, it appears increasingly clear that the former Alaska governor, vice-presidential nominee and conservative favorite will not appear on behalf of either New Jersey’s Chris Christie or Virginia’s Bob McDonnell. Palin is the only one of the most talked-about potential 2012 presidential candidates who has not yet campaigned for either Republican candidate.
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JohnMcCain’s new mission: A GOP makeover

Sen. John McCain couldn't become President of the United States so his next impossible mission is even more daunting: Reshape the Republican Party in his own image. Politico reports McCain is working behind the scenes to remake the GOP. His vision? A center-right party that appeals to political pragmatists and moderates. It won't be easy. Right-wing extremists hijacked the Republican Party many years ago and have a solid hold. McCain, however, is stubborn and persistent.
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Bill Clinton: The vast right wing conspiracy is back

Bill Clinton says a vast, right-wing conspiracy that once targeted him is now focusing on President Barack Obama. The ex-president made the comment in a television interview when he was asked about one of the signature moments of the Monica Lewinsky affair over a decade ago. Back then, first lady Hillary Rodham Clinton used the term "vast, right-wing conspiracy" to describe how her husband's political enemies were out to destroy his presidency. Bill Clinton was asked on NBC's "Meet the Press" whether the conspiracy is still there. He replied: "You bet. Sure it is. It's not as strong as it was because America has changed demographically. But it's as virulent as it was." Clinton said that this time around, the focus is on Obama and "their agenda seems to be wanting him to fail."
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Some walk out on Palin during speech

Former vice-presidential nominee Sarah Palin said the US government was wasting taxpayers' money and could aggravate poverty, said delegates at her first speech outside North America on Wednesday. Palin, the former governor of Alaska, gave hundreds of financial big-hitters at the CLSA Investors' Forum in Hong Kong a wide-ranging speech that covered Alaska, international terrorism, US economic policy and trade with China. Her performance, which was closed to the media, divided opinion. Some of those who attended praised her forthright views on government social and economic intervention and others walked out early in disgust. "She was brilliant," said a European delegate, on condition of anonymity.
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Right-wing Christians target 16 Democrats

Conservative Christians, a key base for the Republican Party, said on Saturday they were targeting 16 Democrats, including Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, in the 2010 congressional elections. Four other Democratic senators and 11 U.S. representatives were on the list, which was released at a summit in Washington of conservative "values voters" who are rallying against President Barack Obama's agenda. The mid-term elections will be the first national test for Obama, who has seen his approval ratings fall in recent months as he and his ruling Democratic Party attempted to push through a sweeping overhaul of the healthcare sector.
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GOP attacks: Deja vu all over again

On television screens in many but not all of America's schools, America's president spent less than a half hour Tuesday trying to inspire students who are used to being talked at by adults.

So Barack Obama talked to them not only as a president but also as one who had been in their shoes, sat in their desks -- and at times had messed up. He challenged them to take "responsibility" for their own education. As controversial speeches go, this one was the educational equivalent of an oration extolling motherhood. Yet for a week it became the media's summer-end sideshow.


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Democrats headed for doomsday

Charlie Cook, the veteran political handicapper who successfully predicted the Republican takeover of Congress in 1994 and forecast a Democratic return to power in 2006, says Democrats are headed for disaster at the ballot box in 2010.

"The situation this summer has slipped completely out of Control for President Obama and congressional Democrats," Cook writes in his latest newsletter, The Cook Report.

"Many veteran congressional election watchers, including Democratic ones, report an eerie sense of deja vu, with a consensus forming that the chances of Democratic losses going higher than 20 seats is just as good as the chances of Democratic losses going lower than 20 seats," Cook writes.


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Cheney calls CIA probe political

The self-anointed attack dog for the failed administration of former President George W. Bush, which turned the Justice Department into a political hack agency, Sunday accused the Obama administration of playing politics with the investigation of prisoner torture.

Former Vice President Dick Cheney turned to Fox News, the mouthpiece for Republicans, to launch his latest attacks.

"I just think it's an outrageous precedent to set, to have this kind of, I think, intensely partisan, politicized look back at the prior administration," Cheney said in an interview broadcast Sunday.

Cheney's broadsides are the latest in an orchestrated series of attacks from the former Vice President.


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South Carolina GOP pissed at Sanford

Republican legislators fumed Saturday over Gov. Mark Sanford's affair and questionable travel, though they stopped short of trying to force his resignation or impeachment before they return to the Statehouse in January.

Still, the House GOP Caucus that dominates the lower chamber with 73 of the body's 124 members made two things clear — they want Sanford gone and they want to act soon. However, lawmakers are waiting to make any decisions until the state ethics commission finishes its investigation. And starting impeachment proceedings now could require a costly and special session.


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