Archives for Politics

Can Zsa Zsa’s husband save California?

What the world already knows of Prince Frederic von Anhalt reads like a tabloid writer's dream: eighth husband of Zsa Zsa Gabor, lover (never confirmed) of Anna Nicole Smith, self-proclaimed member of European royalty.

The flamboyant socialite says he'll add a new title on Wednesday: California gubernatorial candidate.

Von Anhalt and his attorney said they will file his candidate papers in late morning at the secretary of state's office in Sacramento.

If he follows through, von Anhalt would be the only independent in a field that includes Republicans Meg Whitman and Steve Poizner and the presumed Democratic candidate, Attorney General Jerry Brown.


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Patrick Kennedy didn’t fit political mold

It was never a perfect fit — politics and Patrick Kennedy, the latest and perhaps the last in the long line of Kennedys at the heart of American political life.

The sometimes fragile son of the late Sen. Edward Kennedy has spent all of his adult life in public office, but he has rarely seemed at ease in the spotlight. On Friday, five months after his father's death, he announced he'll retire from Congress, expressing a sense of relief. It will be the first time in six decades that Washington will be without a Kennedy in office.
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Former President Clinton undergoes heart procedure

Former President Bill Clinton had two stents inserted Thursday to prop open a clogged heart artery after being hospitalized with chest pains, an adviser said.

Clinton, 63, "is in good spirits and will continue to focus on the work of his foundation and Haiti's relief and long-term recovery efforts," said adviser Douglas Band.

Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton left Washington and headed to New York to be with her husband, who underwent the procedure at New York Presbyterian Hospital.

Stents are tiny mesh scaffolds used to keep an artery open after it is unclogged in an angioplasty procedure. Doctors thread a tube through a blood vessel in the groin to a blocked artery, inflate a balloon to flatten the clog, and slide the stent into place.
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Sarah Palin to Tea Baggers: ‘It’s time for a revolution’

Sarah Palin, the mouth that roared, brought Tea Party activists to their feet in Nashville Saturday with a rousing speech that called for a "new American revolution."

Palin, of course, was preaching to the choir -- a conservative audience that provided the perfect venue for the former Alaska Governor and failed vice-presidential candidate.

Alternating between folksy humor and sharp jabs at President Barack Obama and Democrats, Palin asked "How's that hope-y, change-y stuff workin' out for you?"

She had high praise for the Tea Bag Party.

"This movement is about the people," Palin said. "Government is supposed to be working for the people."

Amid multiple standing ovations, the keynote speaker to the opening session of the Tea Party's first national convention played to the heart of the group's anti-establishment, grass-roots image.

Her audience waved flags and erupted in cheers during multiple standing ovations as Palin gave the keynote address at the first national convention of the "tea party" coalition. It's an anti-establishment, grass-roots network motivated by anger over the growth of government, budget-busting spending and Obama's policies.
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Sarah Palin: A tsunami of political contradictions

Sarah PalinFor a woman whose resume includes quitting her governor's job in mid-term and failing as a vice presidential candidate, Sarah Palin is sitting pretty these days, raking in the bucks from book sales, pontificating on Facebook and becoming a one-woman media empire.

Indeed, the flake from Wasilla, Alaska, appears to have it made.

Which delights some conservative Republicans who actually still consider the controversial Palin Presidential material and scares the hell out of Democrats who realize that, in a political environment where a one-term Senator from Illinois can become President, anything can happen.
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Senate race set in Illinois

Democratic Senate nominee Alexi Giannoulias (Reuters)An Illinois Democrat who won his party's nomination on Tuesday to campaign for Barack Obama's vacant Senate seat struck a populist tone, attacking his Republican opponent as part of the Washington establishment.

Democratic state treasurer Alexi Giannoulias said the voter discontent that helped Republicans to a surprise victory in last month's Senate race in Massachusetts would work against Representative Mark Kirk, who easily won the Republican primary.

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Illinois: Another pending disaster for Obama

If the Massachusetts special election was a kick in the shins for President Barack Obama, the political turmoil in Illinois, his home state, is a pain in the neck that never seems to go away.

His former Senate seat, already stained by an ethics scandal, is a major takeover target for Republicans. So is the governor's office.

Going into Tuesday's Illinois primary, the first of the 2010 campaign season, Democrats are in disarray, with no political heavyweights in their lineup for the Senate seat that Obama gave up for the White House.

Losing it would be a bigger personal embarrassment for the president than Republican Scott Brown's upset victory in Massachusetts, which took away the late Edward M. Kennedy's Senate seat.

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GOP response: ‘We can’t afford Obama’s policies’

The nation cannot afford the spending Democrats have enacted or the tax increases they propose, Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell said Wednesday in the Republican response to President Barack Obama's State of the Union address.

McDonnell told a cheering crowd of supporters in Richmond, Va., that Democratic policies are resulting in an unsustainable level of debt. He said Americans want affordable health care, but they don't want the government to run it.

"Today, the federal government is simply trying to do too much," McDonnell said. "In the past year, more than 3 million Americans have lost their jobs, yet the Democratic Congress continues deficit spending, adding to the bureaucracy, and increasing the national debt on our children and grandchildren."

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