Archives for Politics

Gallup Poll shows public turnaround in health care support

Nearly half of Americans give a thumbs-up to Congress’ passage of a healthcare reform bill last weekend, with 49% calling it “a good thing.” Republicans and Democrats have polar opposite reactions, with independents evenly split. The findings, from a March 22 USA Today/Gallup poll conducted one day after the bill received a majority of votes in the U.S. House of Representatives, represent immediate reactions to the vote. Americans’ emotional responses to the bill’s passage are more positive than negative — with 50% enthusiastic or pleased versus 42% angry or disappointed — and are similar to their general reactions. Although much
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Palin to Tea Party: Keep shouting

Sarah Palin told thousands of tea party activists assembled in the dusty Nevada desert Saturday that Sen. Harry Reid will have to explain his votes when he comes back to his hometown to campaign. The wind whipped U.S. flags behind the former Alaska governor as she stood on a makeshift stage, holding a microphone and her notes and speaking to a cheering crowd. She told them Reid, fighting for re-election, is “gambling away our future.” “Someone needs to tell him, this is not a crapshoot,” Palin said. At least 9,000 people streamed into tiny Searchlight, a former mining town 60
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Manadatory health insurance: A GOP idea?

Republicans were for President Barack Obama‘s requirement that Americans get health insurance before they were against it. The obligation in the new health care law is a Republican idea that’s been around at least two decades. It was once trumpeted as an alternative to Bill and Hillary Clinton’s failed health care overhaul in the 1990s. These days, Republicans call it government overreach. Mitt Romney, weighing another run for the GOP presidential nomination, signed such a requirement into law at the state level as Massachusetts governor in 2006. At the time, Romney defended it as “a personal responsibility principle” and Massachusetts’
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States challenge constitutionality of health care law

Top legal officials from 14 states across the country on Tuesday filed lawsuits challenging an overhaul of the U.S.’ $2.5 trillion healthcare system, minutes after President Barack Obama signed the landmark legislation. One joint lawsuit by a dozen Republican attorneys general and a Democrat claims the sweeping reforms violate state-government rights in the U.S. Constitution and will force massive new spending on hard-pressed state governments. Virginia went to court separately, while Missouri Republican Lieutenant Gov. Peter Kinder said he would like to join the suit. The joint suit, led by Florida, was filed with a federal court in Pensacola, according
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Idaho: Screw mandatory health care insurance

Idaho is leading the charge in a states-rights push to defeat a proposal in Congress that would require people to buy health insurance, a key piece of reforms being pushed by President Barack Obama. Republican Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter used a ceremony Wednesday afternoon to become the first governor to sign into law a measure requiring the state attorney general to sue the federal government over any such insurance mandates. There’s similar legislation pending in 37 other states, a point Otter stressed when asked if the bill he signed can succeed, given constitutional law experts are already saying federal laws
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Rielle Hunter ‘upset’ over racy photos

If Rielle Hunter, John Edwards‘ bedmate, expected to create public sympathy with her photo spread in GQ magazine, her judgment was as lacking as her clothing. Hunter chose to appear in the magazine clad only in a man’s dress shirt and nothing else. The photos prompted an immediately outcry that the “other woman” who helped bring down Edwards’ once-promising political career and his marriage to his cancer-stricken wife was using sex to sell her story. So Hunter pulled a Miley Cyrus, claiming the photographer “used” her and violated her trust. She reportedly called Barbara Walter “in tears” and called the
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Liz Cheney’s witchhunt flames out

A witchhunt orchestrated by George W. Bush supporters against government lawyers representing Guantanamo inmates has backfired, as conservatives joined the outcry against the McCarthy-like attacks. “Who are these government officials? Eric Holder would only name two. What’s the secrecy behind the other seven? Whose values do they share?” asks the video ad posted online by the conservative group Keep America Safe. “Tell Eric Holder the Americans have the right to know their identities, the Al-Qaeda Seven.” Liz Cheney, daughter of former vice president Dick Cheney, has come under fire from left and right for orchestrating the campaign questioning the patriotism
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Utah GOP leader admits hot tub romp with minor

Utah’s House majority leader said late Thursday he paid a woman $150,000 to keep silent about going nude “hot-tubbing” with her when she was minor a quarter century ago. In a shocking statement on the House floor, Kevin Garn, 55, of Layton said he paid her to keep quiet about the incident during his unsuccessful U.S. congressional bid in 2002, but did not have sexual contact with her. Garn said the woman, who he didn’t identify on the floor, has been calling news outlets and that he wanted to be open about the incident that occurred when he was 28
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The never-ending debate over abortion

President Barack Obama’s health care bill would change federal policy on abortion, but not open the spigot of taxpayer dollars that some abortion opponents fear. Abortion rights groups such as Planned Parenthood and NARAL Pro-Choice America say the House and Senate versions of the bill represent the biggest expansion of abortion restrictions in years, yet they’re not trying to defeat the measures. Instead, a bitter dispute among abortion opponents over which version is stricter could derail Obama’s quest to remake the health insurance system. Major anti-abortion groups such as the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops and the National Right to
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Bitter partisanship not new in America

The current partisan divide is as stark and nasty as any in recent history and on almost every issue — from health care to energy independence to reviving the economy — there’s little or no effort to find common ground. But fierce political battle is also a tradition ingrained in American history. If today’s hostile environment is particularly intense, it’s downright genteel compared to many battles of the past. The Civil War, when anti- and pro-slavery forces split the nation, is the most extreme example. But there’s also the beginning of the 20th century, when the country was becoming more
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