Archives for Politics

In this election year, inexperience pays off

All hail inexperience — the less familiarity with politics the better, no matter the party or state. “This election is the first time my name has ever been on a ballot,” appointed Sen. Michael Bennet of Colorado said Tuesday night, hours after dispatching his rival in a bitter Democratic primary. Two major mountain ranges away, first-time Republican candidate Linda McMahon said it slightly differently. “The support of the voters of Connecticut isn’t bestowed by the establishment or the pundits or the media. It isn’t a birthright,” the former World Wrestling Entertainment executive said after winning the GOP senatorial nomination in
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Colorado’s three-ring political circus

In an election year already notable for anti-establishment fervor and spoiler candidates, nothing beats Colorado’s political circus. Party elites have lost control of the nominating process in the state’s three biggest races: the Democratic Senate primary and the GOP contests for governor and Senate. With Tuesday’s primary looming, incumbents and veteran politicians are wondering what hit them. After spending $5.8 million, some of it raised by President Barack Obama, Democratic Sen. Michael Bennet had to give his campaign a last-minute $300,000 loan to try to counter a blistering attack ad from intraparty rival Andrew Romanoff. In the Republican Senate showdown,
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A political dynasty ends

They called it “Team Kilpatrick,” a small army of family and friends dedicated to keeping a Detroit congresswoman and her brash, rising star son in office. As election cycles rolled around, team members donned their trademark green and yellow jackets and poured into Detroit’s neighborhoods to knock on doors, pass out literature and get people to the polls. Until now, it always worked. But the formidable machine that helped keep Carolyn Cheeks Kilpatrick in Congress and put her son, Kwame, in the Detroit mayor’s office may have finally ground to a halt with Ms. Kilpatrick’s defeat this week in her
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Politics of poopy diapers

The dirt — specifically dirty diapers — is flying in Florida’s race for governor. In one television commercial, newcomer Rick Scott suggests his GOP primary opponent, the state attorney general and a former congressman, should be thrown out like a baby’s dirty diaper. “Bill McCollum‘s record stinks,” a female narrator says over an image of a squirming infant’s swaddled bottom. In response, McCollum criticizes Scott for the record settlement his former hospital company paid to settle Medicare fraud charges. McCollum claims his opponent was “ripping off taxpayers.” He looks into the camera in his ad and addresses Scott as if
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Alvin Greene speaks!

In his first campaign appearance, South Carolina’s surprising U.S. Senate candidate Alvin Greene avoided any major gaffes Sunday as he hit his three major themes of jobs, education and justice. The speech started off with a joke and ended with Greene timidly waving, a shy smile spreading across his face as he got a standing ovation before a friendly audience in his hometown of Manning. Greene’s 6 1/2 minute speech at the local NAAP’s monthly meeting was mostly serious. Left out was any mention of his suggestion earlier this month that creating a line of action figures modeled after him
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Angle: Her campaign is ‘God’s calling’

Republican Sharron Angle says her campaign to unseat Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid in Nevada is “a calling” from God and that her faith is helping her endure a fiercely competitive race in which Democrats have depicted her as a conservative extremist. “When you have God in your life … he directs your path,” Angle told the Christian Broadcasting Network in an interview posted on its website Wednesday. Asked why she entered the race, Angle said “the reason is a calling.” “When God calls you he also equips you and He doesn’t just say, ‘Well today you’re going to run
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Voters reject Tea Party candidate in Alabama

A mainstream Republican rolled past a tea party activist Tuesday in the GOP runoff for a southeast Alabama congressional seat that Republicans hope to reclaim. Montgomery City Councilwoman Martha Roby was drawing 60 percent in the unofficial count in the 2nd Congressional District GOP runoff Tuesday against Rick Barber, a former Marine who operates a Montgomery pool hall that hosts tea party meetings. Roby will face conservative Democratic U.S. Rep. Bobby Bright in the fall. Bright’s win in 2008 marked the first time the GOP had lost the seat since 1964. In other races, self-described outsider state Rep. Robert Bentley
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Gibbs: GOP could win control of House

Republicans  could win control of the House of Representatives in elections in November, White House spokesman Robert Gibbs acknowledged on Sunday. “There is no doubt there are enough seats at play that could cause Republicans to gain control, there is no doubt about that,” Gibbs told NBC’s “Meet the Press” talk show when asked whether the Democrats would maintain their majority in the House. All 435 seats in the House are up for grabs in the November 2 election as well as 36 of the 100 seats in the Senate. President Barack Obama will have a tougher time pushing his
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Democrats, Republicans take different tacks for election

Democrats and Republicans are framing the elections in starkly different terms, with GOP strategists painting it as a national referendum on President Barack Obama and the party in power, and Democrats working feverishly to make all politics local. The outcome will help determine whether Republicans take control of the House, the Senate or both. It also may profoundly affect Obama’s agenda for the next two years. Republicans have every reason to try to nationalize the Nov. 2 election, when voters will fill all 435 House seats, 36 Senate seats and 37 governorships. Democrats succeeded in the elections of 2006 and
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Tea Party: Moving from enraged to engaged

Bill Warner is hardly a naive man. He ran his own engineering firm for three decades, and sold the assets just before the economy tanked. He built his dream home on a majestic hill abutting a national park, back when the housing market was steady. While some neighbors have since been foreclosed upon, Warner is resurfacing his flagstone deck. And so he understands that in the world of politics, his little group — the Lincoln Club of the Morongo Basin — is but a molecule in the figurative drop in the bucket of power and influence. Its stated purpose is
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