Archives for Politics

The Tea Party: A phony grassroots movement headed for political oblivion?

This week’s primaries were supposed to be a celebration for the so-called Tea Party, a phony grassroots movement that is really a front for the extreme right-wing. Instead, several of the party’s annointed candidates lost to establishment opponents and some who won — like fringe candidate Sharron Angle in the Nevada GOP Senate primary — highlight the con job the Tea Party is trying to pull on American voters. Notes The Washington Post: The national “tea party” movement’s recent winning streak broke with Tuesday’s primary results, providing fresh evidence of the decentralized conservative network’s struggle to convert activist anger and
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Tea Party becomes Harry Reid’s new best friend

The Tea Party and its extreme right-wing Nevada Senate candidate Sharron Angle are Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid’s new best friends. Before Tuesday’s Senate primary in Nevada, most political oddsmakers considered Reid a goner. Now he’s got new life, thanks to the nomination of Angle, a fringe Tea Party poster child who thinks water flouridation is a Communist plot, abortions cause breast cancer and nuclear waste belongs at Yucca Mountain not far from Las Vegas. Congressional Quarterly, a respected Washington political publication that handicaps races, moved the Nevada Senate campaign from “leans Republicans” to “tossup,” which gives the veteran Nevada
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Unknown South Carolina Democratic Senate nominee faces felony charge

How did a 32-year-old unemployed vet who lives with his parents and who faces a felony charge end up the Democratic nominee for Senate in South Carolina? That’s a question vexing political professionals in the Palmetto state and one that has some smelling a Republican rat in the primary process that saw Alvin Greene, a political novice and unknown, defeat a former state legislator and prosecutor to emerge as the challenger to Republican Senator Jim DeMint. Greene ran no public campaign. He didn’t have signs, a web site or ads. He didn’t raise money. He did have a pending felony
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Primaries showcase fall political themes

The subplots abounded Tuesday night: Antipathy toward elected officials and the establishment. The power of special interests. Tests of party purity. The tea party. The quixotic fight against hyper-partisanship. Each of these narratives, any one of them a powerful story line on its own, came together on the busiest day of the primary season, a concentrated preview of November’s midterm elections. And each was a result or a cause of the single most defining trait of the U.S. political landscape: A dispirited public is demanding change. Again. SPECIAL INTERESTS: Sen. Blanche Lincoln, a centrist from Arkansas, defied an anti-incumbent boomlet
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Rand Paul breaks copyright law with fundraising video

Right-wing Republican Senatorial Candidate Rand Paul of Kentucky feels businesses should have a right to ignore the law and discriminate against minorities and gays if they want and he also apparently feels his campaign can ignore copyright law if it wants. An attorney for the Canadian rock band Rush sent Paul’s campaign a “cease and desist” letter this week for using using the group’s music without permission. The Paul campaign used a Rush song in a fund raising video and also at a rally in Kentucky. Rush attorney Robert Farmer of Toronto says the band’s objection to use of the
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Another day, another claim of an affair with Nikki Haley

A South Carolina lobbyist resigned from a rival political campaign on Wednesday and then became the second man to claim he had a tryst with a Republican lawmaker trying to become the state’s first female governor. Lobbyist Larry Marchant admitted he had no proof to back up his allegation of a one-night stand with state Rep. Nikki Haley in 2008 and her campaign vehemently denied the allegation. The claim became the latest political drama for a state that was roiled when Gov. Mark Sanford made a tearful confession last summer to sneaking out of the country to rendezvous with an
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This year, it pays to be an ‘angry outsider’

Heads up, tea partiers. You’re not the only folks staking claim to the mantle of angry outsider. In state after state, voters are taking out their frustrations at the political establishment — and no place reflects the depth and diversity of their ire better than Arkansas, where unions, corporate interests and several insurgent candidates hope to ride high on the mad-as-heck tide. In the home state of former President Bill Clinton, and elsewhere, party leaders and structures are being bypassed — undermined, in some cases — by free-agent candidates who declare their independence from the political establishment while aligning themselves
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Rand Paul plans to dump his campaign staff

It’s the oldest ploy in politics. When a candidate screws up, blame the staff and start firing people. Rand Paul, the Tea Party darling that upset the political establishment to win the Kentucky GOP Senatorial nomination and then upset most everyone else with off-the-wall comments about racial segregation, announced Tuesday he’s dumping his staff of political novices and volunteers and turning to more established political pros. Palul said he’s planning a campaign staff shakeup but would not elaborate on the details. Campaign manager David Adams, a Republican blogger before entering the heady world of statewide politics, will most likely be
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Did South Carolina governor candidate bang a blogger?

A conservative political blogger says he banged South Carolina Republican candidate Nikki Haley — a Tea Party sweetheart endorsed by Sarah Palin — while serving as her speechwriter and communications specialist. Will Folks claims the affair happened in 2007 but Haley says she never slept with Folks and calls his allegations “quite simply South Carolina politics at its worst.” Folks publishes FITSNews.Com, a blog that features politics, scantily clad women and other news. He was charged with criminal domestic violence in 2005 and cut a deal with prosecutors. At the time he worked for former South Carolina Gov. Mark Sanford
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Memo to political parties: Adapt or die

Since the birth of the American political party, its primary mission has been to amass power by recruiting candidates, raising money and spreading messages. In short, a holding company that elects people — with a monopoly for a century and a half by Democrats and Republicans. But a chain of events in recent history — from the Internet’s astonishing ascent and a Supreme Court ruling on political money to today’s maelstrom of voter anger — is changing things. The major political parties are inching now toward a decision point: change with the times or risk diminished influence. Results of primaries
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