Politics

Obama takes Virginia, DC; McCain edges in VA

A surging Sen. Barack Obama has captured both the Virginia and District of Columbia primaries Tuesday while polls remain open later than scheduled in Maryland due to weather.

Sen. John McCain has captured a close race in Virginia.

With Obama expected to capture 60 percent of the vote in the Old Dominion, the Illinois Senator continues to put distance between himself and former frontrunner Hillary Rodham Clinton.

The television networks declared Obama the winner in DC based on exit polls.

Clinton has already moved on, hoping to rebound in delegate-laden states like Ohio, Texas and Ohio.

Obama wins Virginia; GOP race too close to call

Barack Obama has won Virginia’s Democratic primary, defeating Hillary Rodham Clinton.

Obama is also hoping to capture first place in Tuesday’s Democratic primaries in Maryland and the District of Columbia.

Republicans are voting, too, and it looks like Mike Huckabee is making an unexpectedly strong challenge to John McCain in Virginia.

The Associated Press made its Democratic call based on surveys of voters as they left the polls.

Hillary won’t release tax returns

Resisting calls from Barack Obama to release her income tax returns, Hillary Rodham Clinton said Monday she would only do so if she secures the Democratic presidential nomination and contended her rival had been less than candid about his relationship with major campaign contributors.

Obama hopes to turn Potomac Tuesday into a rout

Democrat Barack Obama hopes to rout Hillary Rodham Clinton in presidential primaries in Virginia, Maryland and the District of Columbia while Republican John McCain seeks to put more distance between himself and Mike Huckabee.

Coming off weekend victories in five contests, Obama was favored to win the Tuesday trio of primaries thanks to a blend of black and better educated voters in those areas, blocs that have aided his wins in earlier matchups against Clinton. Likewise, McCain was favored on the GOP side.

“We need something new,” Obama told a huge rally at the University of Maryland on Monday, dismissing the former first lady’s suggestions that he is not tough enough for the rigors of the presidency.

McCain is the right’s only real choice

The current position of conservative ideologues on Sen. John McCain’s worthiness to be the Republican presidential nominee reminds one of the young man who threatens to punish a strict father by joining the Army. The result is likely to be far worse than accepting the fact that not everyone is as philosophically perfect as one would like. Thank the good Lord.

Why does Hillary stand by her man?

I cannot count the number of women I have heard call Hillary Rodham Clinton a “damned fool” and “an idiot,” along with other names, for staying with her adulterous husband, President Bill Clinton, after the Monica Lewinsky scandal.

When I try to defend Hillary Clinton, particularly now that she is running for the White House, I have to fight off and otherwise absorb a lot of incredulity and anger. Three women treated me to a profanity-laced scolding, the likes of which I have not experienced since Marine Corps boot camp at Parris Island.

Conservative Gary Bauer endorses McCain

Republican John McCain challenged the notion he is struggling to rally conservative critics as he picked up the endorsement Monday of evangelical leader Gary Bauer.

“We’re doing fine. We’re doing fine,” McCain told reporters in Annapolis, dismissing the notion that losses in two states on Saturday had hurt his campaign.

Obama takes Maine, closes in on Clinton

Barack Obama defeated Hillary Rodham Clinton in Maine presidential caucuses Sunday, grabbing a majority of delegates as the state’s Democrats overlooked the snowy weather and turned out in heavy numbers for municipal gatherings.

Democrats in 420 Maine towns and cities were deciding how the state’s 24 delegates will be allotted at the party’s national convention in August. Despite the weather, turnout was “incredible,” party executive director Arden Manning said.

With 99 percent of the participating precincts reporting, Obama led in state delegates elected over Clinton, 2,079 to 1,396, with 18 uncommitted.

Obama takes early lead in Maine caucus

Democrats overlooked the snowy weather and turned out in heavy numbers for municipal caucuses Sunday, giving Barack Obama a slight lead over Hillary Rodham Clinton in early tallies for the party’s party presidential nominee.

Democrats in 420 Maine towns and cities were deciding how the state’s 24 delegates will be allotted at the party’s national convention in August. Despite the weather, turnout was “incredible,” party executive director Arden Manning said.

With 11 percent of the participating precincts reporting, Obama had a narrow lead over clinton Clinton, 175 to 168, with four uncommitted.

The voting came a day after Obama and Clinton made personal appeals here, and after Obama picked up wins in Louisiana, Nebraska and Washington.

Clinton sacks campaign boss

Democratic Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton replaced campaign manager Patti Solis Doyle with longtime aide Maggie Williams on Sunday, engineering a shake-up in a presidential campaign struggling to overcome rival Barack Obama’s financial and political strengths.

The surprise announcement came hours after Obama’s sweep of three contests Saturday. The Illinois senator also grabbed the early lead in caucuses in Maine on Sunday.