Politics

Hillary’s long record of bending the rules

America’s chief domestic priority this year is to prevent Hillary Rodham Clinton’s election as president of the United States. Beyond her dreadful ideas, she shares her husband’s allergy to the rule of law and the basic standards of fairness and honesty that most people expect of themselves.

Looking beyond Ferraro’s flub

Geraldine Ferraro is upset. She had said Barack Obama wouldn’t be doing so well in the presidential race if he weren’t black, the comment encountered fierce objections from the Obama camp and elsewhere, and now she wants you to know it wasn’t racist. And she’s right. It wasn’t. It was just stupid.

Olbermann rips Clinton & Ferraro

Was MSNBC’s Keith Olbermann right or wrong on his comments about Hillary Clinton’s handling of Geraldine Ferraro’s comments and other charges of racism in her campaign?

Watch the video of his comments Wednesday night and make up your own mind. Then tell us what you think.

Too much baloney from Republicans

Once the Democrats decide what to do about the Michigan and Florida kerfuffle, who wins the Pennsylvania and Puerto Rico primaries, how the superdelegates weigh in and whether or not the issue goes to a brokered convention, they will have a nominee.

Disrupting political caucuses

Search the Web for “caucus disruptions” and allegations of caucus-vote disruptions lodged against supporters of Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton predominate among the first 20 links that come up. I have obtained a copy of a memo written by a Clinton campaign volunteer in Washington state intended only for other Clinton volunteers in subsequent caucus states (specifically for Texas campaign volunteers). It warns them of “caucus disruption strategies” by supporters of Sen. Barack Obama.

The naked truth about political life

The other day an unpaid foreign policy adviser for Barack Obama called Hillary Clinton a “monster.” In a political age when every word is automatically taken literally, this caused a monstrous stir. It has calmed down a bit since the pants fell off New York Gov. Eliot Spitzer’s dignity, but I think this bears more examination.

Apologists might say that the loose-tongued Samantha Power, who resigned over her comment, was not suggesting that Hillary was a real monster. It was merely a figure of speech. It was, however, very rude of her.

Defiant Ferraro quits Clinton campaign

Geraldine Ferraro stepped down Wednesday from an honorary post in Hillary Rodham Clinton’s presidential campaign amid a controversy regarding her comments that Barack Obama wouldn’t be succeeding in the race for the White House if he weren’t black.

Spitzer will resign at 11:30 a.m. EDT

New York Gov. Eliot Spitzer has decided to resign, completing a stunning fall from power after he was nationally disgraced by links to a high-priced prostitution ring, a top state official said Wednesday.

Spitzer is scheduled to announce his resignation at 11:30 a.m., according to a second top Spitzer staffer. The officials spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because the announcement had not yet been made.

Spitzer would be replaced by Lt. Gov. David Paterson, who will become New York’s first black governor.

Democrats do the math and find no answers

Facing a revived Hillary Rodham Clinton, Democrat Barack Obama has dropped a tenet of his early strategy that seemed vital to his January successes: the conviction that he can win almost anywhere if he has enough time to engage voters.

With the important Pennsylvania contest six weeks away — a near eternity in presidential primaries — Obama is playing down his chances here, even though a victory would effectively finish Clinton. His aides are emphasizing instead the need to campaign in North Carolina, Indiana and other presumably friendlier states that will vote even later.

Clinton baits but Obama isn’t biting

If Hillary Rodham Clinton is baiting her Democratic presidential rival with increasingly pointed criticisms, Barack Obama isn’t biting. At least not yet.

Savoring his Mississippi primary victory Tuesday, Obama brushed off the aggressive tactics of Clinton and her supporters, said he’d support her in the fall if she happens to win and predicted a united Democratic party in the general election.