Archives for Politics

New poll pops Palin’s bubble

Sarah Palin, once the star of the Republican and/or Tea parties, is now just a falling star, a new Gallup Poll shows. Gallup surveyed American voters following the Nov. 2 election and found Palin’s unfavorable numbers at a new high — 52 percent — while her favorable rating stands at 40 percent — tying her lowest numbers in older plls. While 80 percent of Republicans hold a favorable view of Palin, the poll found 53 percent of independent voters and 81 percent of Democrats see her in an unfavorable light. Bottom line. Palin could conceivably win the GOP nomination as
Read More

Poll: Palin ‘most polarizing’ of GOP wannabes

Sarah Palin is the most polarizing of the potential 2012 Republican presidential candidates, while impressions of Mike Huckabee and Mitt Romney lean more positive, according to an Associated Press-GfK poll. As for the rest — Pawlenty, Barbour, Thune, Daniels — most Americans say, “Who?” The election, of course, is far away, and polls this early largely reflect name recognition and a snapshot of current popularity. A year before the last presidential election, the top names in public opinion polls were Rudy Giuliani for the Republicans and Hillary Rodham Clinton for the Democrats. Neither won their party’s nomination. But jockeying among
Read More

White Southern Democrats: An endangered species

The white Southern Democrat — endangered since the 1960s civil rights era — is sliding nearer to extinction. After this week’s elections, the Democratic Party barely holds a presence in the region outside of majority-black urban areas such as Atlanta and Memphis. The carnage for the party was particularly brutal in the Deep South, where just one white Democrat survived across Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia and South Carolina. The Republicans’ effort to win over the South, rooted decades ago in a strategy to capitalize on white voters’ resentment of desegregation, is all but complete. “Right now in most of Dixie
Read More

Independents, seniors said ‘no’ to Democrats

Independents and people 65 and older are two pivotal voting blocs neither party can afford to lose. Right now, Democrats have alienated both. As attention begins to shift to the 2012 presidential and congressional races, President Barack Obama and Democrats must figure out how to woo both groups back to avoid a replay of Tuesday’s Republican triumph. Exit polls of voters in the congressional elections show the damage Democrats must repair — 56 percent of independents and 59 percent of seniors voted for Republican House candidates, with each delivering decisive margins of roughly 20 percentage points for the GOP. For
Read More

Many rich candidates couldn’t buy an election victory

Dipping into their personal fortunes to finance a political campaign turned out to be a losing investment for several candidates trying to break into political office. Former eBay chief executive Meg Whitman took the biggest gamble, spending $142 million in her losing effort to become California’s next governor, a figure that covers the general election and her GOP primary race. In Connecticut, former wrestling entertainment executive Linda McMahon is expected to have spent at least $50 million in a losing U.S. Senate bid. And in New York, millionaire developer Carl Paladino was expected to spend about $10 million in a
Read More

OK, we won. Now what?

Emboldened by a commanding House majority and Senate gains, Republican leaders vowed Wednesday to deliver on their “golden opportunity” to roll back the size of government and President Barack Obama‘s signature health care law. “Change course we will,” said Ohio Rep. John Boehner, the speaker-in-waiting, describing Tuesday’s midterm elections as a mandate to shrink the government. That echoed the unrelenting demand of tea party activists whose energy and votes helped to fuel the largest turnover in the House in more than 70 years. The capital awoke — if it ever slept — to a new political order. With their lopsided
Read More

Voter anger puts GOP back in charge of the House

Republicans drew on the support of independents and the energy of tea party activists to fashion a resounding victory in the House in midterm elections, increased their strength in the Senate and quickly served notice they intend to challenge President Barack Obama with a conservative approach to the economy. “We hope President Obama will now respect the will of the people, change course, and to commit to making changes they are demanding,” Ohio Rep. John Boehner, the House speaker-in-waiting, told cheering partisans as GOP gains mounted Tuesday night. Obama called Boehner to offer congratulations, and also telephoned Senate Republican leader
Read More

The rise and fall of Nancy Pelosi

Nancy Pelosi became the first woman to lead the U.S. House of Representatives by taking on the most powerful man on Earth — then-President George W. Bush and his unpopular Iraq war. Now, four years later, the California Democrat is likely to lose the House speakership because of Congress‘ inability — and that of Bush’s Democratic successor, Barack Obama — to revive the ailing U.S. economy. Polls show fewer than one in three Americans approve of Pelosi and Republicans are expected to win back control of the House from Democrats in Tuesday’s elections mostly because of anger over the lack
Read More

On final weekend campaign swing, Obama lashes out at GOP

On his final campaign swing through four states in the Northeast and Midwest before Tuesday’s midterm elections, President Barack Obama is asking Democratic voters to go to the polls and help stem an expected Republican tide. “Chicago, it’s up to you to let them know that we have not forgotten, we don’t have amnesia,” the president told a large outdoor crowd late Saturday near his home, referring to the economic recession that hit during George W. Bush‘s presidency. He said the election is a choice between the policies that caused the problems and policies that will lead the country to
Read More

Tea Party winners will find life in Congress is not a party

As Rand Paul lumbers toward an expected win in Kentucky’s often nasty Senate race, he embodies the promise and peril of a phenomenon the GOP establishment must accommodate if the party is to govern and campaign effectively from here on. Paul is almost the perfect tea party flag bearer. The first-time candidate and small-government philosopher is practically tea party royalty since his father is libertarian hero Ron Paul, the Texas congressman. And no one did more than Rand Paul to make the tea party this year’s political sensation. He trounced the Republican establishment’s hand-picked candidate in the May primary. Then
Read More