Archives for Politics

Obama set to kick off 2012 fundraising

President Barack Obama will kick off his 2012 campaign fundraising efforts later this week in his hometown of Chicago, which will also serve as the headquarters for his campaign. The president, who raised a whopping $750 million in 2008 and may raise as much as $1 billion this time around, formally announced his re-election last week. The Democratic National Committee says that on Thursday he travels to Chicago where he’ll hold a fundraising kick-off at the Navy Pier. Ticket prices will start at $100, making the event relatively accessible to supporters compared with the high-dollar events he often attends. Obama
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Bachmann, Paul fault Republicans

Two possible Republican presidential candidates speaking in Iowa on Monday criticized their own party leaders for failing to cut enough from the federal budget. Texas Congressman Ron Paul criticized both President Barack Obama’s budget and a proposal by Wisconsin Republican Congressman Paul Ryan in a speech at an Iowa college. “Neither of those budgets will solve our problems, won’t even come close,” said Paul, speaking at the Dordt College Campus Center in Sioux Center Monday morning. In a speech at an Iowa high school, Minnesota Congresswoman Michele Bachmann criticized a last-minute budget deal reached Friday between Obama and congressional leaders
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Romney tries to learn from past

In his first presidential run in 2008, Mitt Romney sought back-to-back victories in Iowa and New Hampshire to propel him to the GOP nomination. He won neither, the two-state sprint failed and so did his candidacy. This time his strategy is more of a multi-state marathon, with economically suffering Nevada an important round in what advisers predict could be a protracted fight to be the party’s 2012 nominee. On his first trip this year to Nevada, the former Massachusetts governor toured a neighborhood north of Las Vegas Friday that has been very hard hit by foreclosures and talked throughout his
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Will feds indict John Edwards?

Prosecutors deciding whether to indict John Edwards over payments made to keep his pregnant mistress in hiding are spending more time with their chief witness, Andrew Young, who posed as the father of Edwards’ out-of-wedlock baby during the 2008 presidential campaign. The Associated Press saw Young leaving his attorney’s Washington office after meeting with the prosecutors for more than four hours Thursday. The interview is particularly notable because of its timing. Young has already been questioned by a grand jury investigating Edwards in 2009, and the Justice Department is considering whether to move forward with an indictment. Justice Department officials
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Supremes unimpressed with Arizona campaign finance law

The Supreme Court appeared poised Monday to strike down a provision of a campaign financing system in Arizona that gives extra cash to publicly funded candidates who face privately funded rivals and independent groups. Such a decision would be another blow to public campaign financing, once thought of as an antidote to the corrupting influence of money in politics. President Barack Obama has been the most prominent example of politicians who have abandoned public financing because they can raise far more money privately. The justices heard arguments in a challenge to the Arizona system that gives candidates who opt for
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Scott Brown looks back over first year in Senate

Scott Brown ran for the Senate vowing to rein in government spending and cut the federal budget deficit. A year later, he is open to increasing the national debt limit so the government can both spend and borrow more. The clash between his campaign rhetoric and voting record underscores the theme of the Republican’s first year replacing a liberal icon, the late Sen. Edward M. Kennedy. To the frequent surprise of Democrats, and often the chagrin of conservatives and tea party activists, Brown has largely kept his pledge to be a bipartisan legislator. He has voted bills up or down
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Cantor: Americans hate health bill

House Majority Leader Eric Cantor says the new health care law is getting in the way of job-creation and vows Republicans are committed to repealing it. Cantor tells CBS‘s “The Early Show” the GOP isn’t retreating from its commitment to get rid of the law overhauling the health care system, even though Senate Democrats have made clear they would block a repeal there. Cantor isn’t accepting a Congressional Budget Office analysis saying the new health care is likely to reduce the federal deficit by $143 billion this year. The Virginia Republican does say, instead, that the bill cost over a
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Census will show growth slowing, GOP gaining

Republican-leaning states will gain at least a half dozen House seats thanks to the 2010 census, which found the nation’s population growing more slowly than in past decades but still shifting to the South and West. The Census Bureau announced Tuesday that the nation’s population on April 1 was 308,745,538, up from 281.4 million a decade ago. The growth rate for the past decade was 9.7 percent, the lowest since the Great Depression. The nation’s population grew by 13.2 percent from 1990 to 2000. Michigan was the only state to lose population during the past decade. Nevada, with a 35
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GOP hopefuls already finding roadblocks

This month’s early, under-the-radar campaigning by potential Republican challengers to President Barack Obama is a reminder of something too easily forgotten: Running for president is harder than it looks, and Obama ultimately will stand against a flesh-and-blood nominee certain to make mistakes along the way. Mitt Romney, Tim Pawlenty and other possible GOP candidates stumbled over health care, taxes and other issues in December, even as Obama coped with the harsh political reality stemming from his party’s “shellacking” in last month’s elections. No serious contender has officially launched a 2012 campaign. But with the Iowa caucuses less than 13 months
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Dump Steele effort gains momentum

A group of conservatives on the Republican National Committee’s governing board has launched an “Anybody but Steele” campaign and are gathering pledges from other committee members not to back the beleaguered RNC chairman, POLITICO has learned. Members of the Republican National Conservative Caucus held a conference call and sent e-mails last week in an attempt to build support for what they’re calling a “Resolution of Commitment.” The same group is also working on a similar, but far more targeted, campaign to persuade the five Republicans challenging Steele not to strike an agreement with him that might improve his prospects —
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