Archives for Politics

Another problem for tea party insurgent

Milton Wolf’s chances of becoming the next tea party insurgent to knock off a GOP party titan got a huge boost when it was revealed that incumbent Pat Roberts’s official residence in Kansas was rented space in a friend’s Dodge City house. The three-term senator seemed perfect for casting as a Washington insider who was out of touch with his home state. But as Tuesday’s Senate primary approaches, the challenge by the suburban Kansas City radiologist is bedeviled by renewed attention to an old episode from his professional life — his posting in 2010 of graphic X-images of patients’ injuries
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Florida legislators meeting to revamp state map

Confronted with a judge’s ruling to swiftly redraw the state’s congressional districts, Florida’s House speaker disclosed extraordinary plans late Sunday to convene a rare summer special session to devise a new map. The speaker, Will Weatherford, sent out an email to legislators advising that they will hold a special session starting Thursday to address the “limited concerns” raised by a Florida judge over the state’s current congressional boundaries. The special session is expected to last up to a week. The decision to hold a special session was triggered by a ruling by a circuit court judge, Terry Lewis. Lewis, who
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Kentucky politics with a side order of barbeque

The annual picnic at Fancy Farm always serves up a main dish of politics along with a side of delicious barbecue. And this year voters will get a rare glimpse of Kentucky’s U.S. Senate candidates standing side by side as they face armies of hecklers trying to move them off their talking points. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell and his Democratic challenger, Alison Lundergan Grimes, will share the same stage for only the second time. One of the most-watched races in the country, it could weigh heavily on which party controls the Senate for the final two years of President
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Can Republicans avoid a Senate upset in Georgia

Republicans are on the offensive in the opening days of Georgia’s Senate campaign, hammering Democrat Michelle Nunn as a rubber stamp for President Barack Obama and questioning her resume as a non-profit executive — the very experience that anchors her appeal as a moderate who gets things done without partisan wrangling. It’s a preview of a high-profile clash between two first-time candidates, Nunn, 47, and former corporate executive David Perdue, 64, with the outcome helping to decide which party controls the Senate for the final two years of Obama’s presidency. Nunn is one of the Democrats’ few hopes to pick
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Martin O’Malley invades Clinton turf in Iowa

Martin O’Malley’s latest foray into Iowa begins, appropriately, in a place called Clinton. The Maryland governor is filling the void in Iowa, New Hampshire and beyond during the early stages of the 2016 presidential race, campaigning for fellow Democrats and making personal appeals while former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton remains the prohibitive — if yet undeclared — favorite. In the summer before November’s mid-term elections, Clinton’s dominant position in a hypothetical field has limited Democrats’ activities in early presidential voting states even while an ambitious slate of Republicans descend. Active Democrats here say O’Malley has become an exception,
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Rick Perry’s Texas start-up fund scam

Texas Gov. Rick Perry has distributed $205 million in taxpayer money to scores of technology startups using a pet program designed to bring high-paying jobs and innovation to the nation’s second most-populous state. But a closer look at the Texas Emerging Technology Fund, one of Perry’s signature initiatives in his 14 years as governor, reveals that some of the businesses that received money are not all they seem. One actually operates in California. Some have stagnated trying to find more capital. Others have listed out-of-state employees and short-term hires as being among the jobs they created. A few have forfeited
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Working class whites now a minority in Ohio

For the first time, working-class whites make up less than half of Ohio’s eligible voters, part of a demographic shift in a key Midwestern swing state that is pushing political parties to widen their appeal beyond the once-dominant bloc. Nationwide, working-class whites — defined as those ages 18 to 64, with less than a bachelor’s degree — are more likely to be socially conservative, less optimistic about their futures and skeptical of big government. But in Ohio, the group has been much more politically divided: encompassing deeply religious, GOP-leaning conservatives in rural areas as well as unionized blue-collar Democrats in
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Overview of political fundraising so far this year

The political parties, their campaign committees and super PACs faced a Sunday deadline to disclose how much donors gave and how much operatives spent in June. Highlights from the filings: ___ MISSISSIPPI GOOD FOR FUNDRAISING The anti-tax Club for Growth Action last month had its second best fundraising haul this election cycle as it raised money to pour into Chris McDaniel’s bid to deny incumbent Republican Thad Cochran a seventh term in the Senate. McDaniel had a narrow edge over Cochran in their primary, but neither candidate captured more than 50 percent of the vote. That sent both into a
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Watching a GOP Senate race in Atlanta, northern Georgia

Neither Republican running in Georgia’s closely watched Senate race has a natural advantage in metro Atlanta, where the state’s most populous area and a ring of northern exurbs are serving as the key battleground ahead of Tuesday’s runoff. Both Rep. Jack Kingston of Savannah and former Dollar General CEO David Perdue have been spending a major portion of their time and money wooing voters along the busy stretches of Interstates 75 and 85 just before they merge south of downtown Atlanta and then as they split off heading for north Georgia and some of the most Republican parts of the
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Rick Perry ready for another Presidential run?

Texas Gov. Rick Perry is visiting Iowa for the fourth time in eight months, hoping for a second chance to win over Republican voters who delivered him a stinging caucus loss when he ran for president two years ago. Perry, 64, hasn’t said if he plans to run again in 2016. But he’s clearly considering it, and is meeting Saturday and Sunday with veterans and conservative activists in the northern Iowa communities of Algona and Clear Lake. “Our nominee normally has done this more than once. I think this goes back to that issue of experience. Experience matters and by
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