Archives for News

Romney cruises to easy primary wins in Nebraska, Oregon

Presumptive GOP Presidential nominee Mitt Romney continued his march towards capturing the necessary delegate totals Tuesday with solid victories in the Nebraska and Oregon primaries. In Nebraska, Romney took home 70.9 percent of the vote, followed by withdrawn candidate Rick Santorum at 14 percent, remaining contender Ron Paul at 9.9 percent and Newt Gingrich at 5.2.  Nebraska’s Republican Party will award 34 of the state’s 35 delegates will be awarded at a state convention in July.  One delegate, a designated party “super delegate” is already pledged to Romney. Oregon gave Romney 72.7 percent, Paul 12.5 percent, Santorum 9.2 percent and
Read More

For some, foreclosure doesn’t mean an end to dream of home ownership

When Jennifer Anderson’s family could no longer afford their mortgage and lost their home, she expected many years to pass before they would again become property owners. But less than two years later, in March, they purchased a $297,000 house outside Phoenix, Arizona, after qualifying for a loan backed by the U.S. government. They joined a small but growing number of Americans who are making a surprisingly quick return to homeownership after defaulting on their loans or being forced into short sales that cost their banks money. “We didn’t really expect it,” said Anderson, 40. “We were resigned to the
Read More

Law doesn’t prevent cozy relationships between campaigns, Super PACs

Looks like President Barack Obama’s allies got the hint. An independent group with deep ties to the president’s re-election campaign launched a television ad Tuesday hitting Mitt Romney‘s business practices at Bain Capital, just 24 hours after Obama’s team debuted its own ad attacking the Republican presidential candidate’s work at the private equity firm. By law, campaigns and the outside groups are forbidden from working with each other. But at times like this, the lines of separation seem blurred if not crossed. “The idea that these groups are independent is a fiction in reality terms and, we believe, a fiction
Read More

Romney’s former opponents rewrite history in real time

Remember Newt Gingrich calling Mitt Romney a liar? Michele Bachmann saying Romney’s unelectable? Rick Santorum calling Romney “the worst Republican in the country” to run against Obama? They’re hoping you don’t. And acting like it never happened (even though most of their words are just clicks away online.) One by one — with the exception of holdout Ron Paul — the GOP also-rans have coughed up endorsements of their onetime rival. And as they do, they’re pulling rhetorical backflips to distance themselves from their former harsh assessments of Romney. Don’t try this at home, folks. It takes a professional politician
Read More

Republicans target popular deductions in tax overhaul plan

It has been nearly 20 years since President George H.W. Bush lost his bid for re-election after making a “no new taxes” pledge, and then agreeing to raise taxes. Since then, Republicans have not touched hundreds of tax breaks in tax laws, fearing that doing so could be called a tax hike. That could be changing. They’re not advertising it, but Republicans in Congress, along with a few Democrats, are exploring the idea of limiting or ending some of Americans’ most sacred tax breaks. They include deductions on contributions to 401(k) retirement accounts and possibly those on home mortgage interest,
Read More

GOP leaning super PAC hopes to lure young voters away from Obama

President Barack Obama counted on the support of younger voters four years ago. Now, a new Republican-leaning “super” political committee wants to bring them to the GOP‘s side. Crossroads Generation, a new super PAC formed with the help of a handful of established GOP groups, is tapping into the economic frustrations of under-30 voters facing dim job prospects, crippling student loans or the prospect of having to move back home with their parents. Starting Monday, the PAC is launching a $50,000 social media ad campaign targeting younger voters in eight swing states, including Ohio and Virginia. Their ultimate goal: woo
Read More

Congress uses legislative sleight-of-hand to hurt opponents, not help nation

Congress is producing little this election year that will become law, yet both parties are churning out bills designed to make the other side look bad. Take a look at separate measures that would protect women from violence, keep student loan rates low and build roads and bridges. Each is a widely shared goal and seemingly easy to enact. But the proposals are caught in pitched battles, each party adding language that infuriates the other. As a result, the Democratic-led Senate and Republican-run House are writing legislation that dies right away or is assured of going nowhere in the other
Read More

Using music and images to make a political statement

Political protest and statement can come in many forms and activists have long used music to spread a message, be it “Give Peace a Chance” by John Lennon, “This Land is Your Land” by Woody Guthrie, “Draft Dodger Rag” by Phil Ochs or “We Shall Overcome,” the anthem of civil rights. Here at Capitol Hill Blue, we constantly look for new ways to spread news and information. Publisher Doug Thompson and his wife added documentary film making to their arsenal of communication tools several years ago and have produced a number of award-winning short films on topics ranging from bluegrass
Read More

Mixing bluegrass music and politics

When politicians come to the Blue Ridge Mountains of Southwestern Virginia they had better know how to shake a leg on the dance floor as well as pick and grin. A mandatory stop for all candidates seeking office is the Friday Night Jamboree, a weekly bluegrass music gathering in the small, one-stoplight town of Floyd. Mark Warner visited the Jamboree frequently and also held town meetings at the Floyd Country Store while serving as governor of Virginia.  His first statewide tour when he ran for the U.S. Senate included a stop at the Friday night Jamboree and he brought former
Read More

Frustrated voter: ‘I’ll bust your nose’

Meet Elmer Underwood. He’s a farmer in Indian Valley, a rural mountain community in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Southwestern Virginia. Speaking at a public hearing on proposed wind turbines in Floyd County, Virginia, Underwood let the board of supervisors know just how he felt about the government coming onto his land to impose its will. It’s not the first time Underwood has told off county officials.  At a hearing on a proposed tax increase two years ago Underwood told supervisors that “I have truck outside with five rails, tar and feathers and I think I know how to put
Read More