Archives for FUBAR

Can Americans even get pay raises any more?

What will it really take to give America a raise? A lot of well-credentialed policy experts have been writing nonsense about why Americans can’t be paid more. One bogus story is that young people and working moms (whatever happened to working dads?) love the new “flexible” economy of Task-Rabbits working odd jobs. Or they’re Uber drivers or Starbucks clerks, marking time until their economic adulthood begins. American University students walk among recruiting booths during a career job fair at American University in WashingtonSome of these people imagine themselves to be high-tech entrepreneurs-in-waiting. Recent college grads who hope that they are
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Obama, commanders, nations meet on Syria, Iraq fight

President Barack Obama and his military commanders will meet Tuesday with defense chiefs from more than 20 nations participating in the fight against the Islamic State group in Syria and Iraq. The daylong meeting comes as the White House tries to tout progress in the U.S.-led campaign against the militants, while also girding the public for a military effort that could extend well beyond Obama’s presidency. Administration officials said the meeting would focus on military strategy and ways to bolster the campaign to counter the extremists. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel said the meeting would be an important effort to further
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About 70 hospital staff members cared for Ebola victim

They drew his blood, put tubes down his throat and wiped up his diarrhea. They analyzed his urine and wiped saliva from his lips, even after he had lost consciousness. About 70 staff members at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital were involved in the care of Thomas Eric Duncan after he was hospitalized, including a nurse now being treated for the same Ebola virus that killed the Liberian man who was visiting Dallas, according to medical records his family provided to The Associated Press. The size of the medical team reflects the hospital’s intense effort to save Duncan’s life, but it
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Gay couples seek marriage licenses in Alaska

Gay couples began applying for marriage licenses in Anchorage on Monday, 15 years after Alaska helped touch off a national debate with a ban on same-sex unions. “It feels very surreal,” Ann Marie Garber said. Garber and her partner, Koy Field, were among the first gay couples seeking a license to wed in Alaska. “I had no idea this would happen in my lifetime,” she said. They decided to apply immediately after the ban was overturned by a federal judge Sunday. “This is historical,” Garber said. “It’s exciting.” U.S. District Court Judge Timothy Burgess ruled that the gay marriage ban
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Settlement reached over Minnesota clergy sex abuse

, Victims of clergy sex abuse stood next to Catholic church leaders in Minnesota on Monday to announce a settlement to a novel lawsuit that includes new measures to keep children safe. The settlement averts a November trial of the claim that the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis and the Diocese of Winona created a public nuisance by failing to warn parishioners about an abusive priest. “We forged a new way and that new way is an action plan — an action plan that not only protects kids in the future, but honors the pain and sorrow and grief
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So, how does a disease like Ebola really spread?

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention confirmed Sunday that a nurse at a Dallas hospital who cared for Thomas Eric Duncan, who died from Ebola last week, was the first person to become infected with the virus on U. S. soil. The nurse reportedly wore a gown, gloves, a mask and a face shield while caring for the Liberian national at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital. Many, including CDC Director Tom Frieden, are questioning how the nurse became infected despite wearing the appropriate personal protective equipment, which should have shielded her from direct contact with Duncan and his bodily fluids.
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Changes in HeathCare.gov: Good or bad?

HealthCare.gov, the website for health insurance under President Barack Obama’s health care law, has been revamped as its second enrollment season approaches. But things are still complicated, since other major provisions of the Affordable Care Act are taking effect for the first time. A look at website and program changes just ahead: ___ Old: 76 online screens to muddle through in insurance application. New: 16 screens — for the basic application that most new customers will use. But about a third of those new customers are expected to have more complicated cases, and how they’ll fare remains to be seen.
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Military faces threats from climate change?

Defense officials say a report slated for release Monday will lay out plans for the Pentagon to get a better handle on how climate change will affect the military, and determine how best to deal with the challenges. Defense Department leaders have long warned that the evolving change in climate patterns, resulting in rising seas and increased severe weather events, will have a broad and costly impact on the Defense Department’s ability to protect the nation and respond to natural and humanitarian disasters in the United States and around the world. Rising sea levels could eventually put vast stretches of
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Can American hospitals safely treat Ebola?

A breach of infection control resulting in a Dallas health worker getting Ebola raises fresh questions about whether hospitals truly can safely take care of people with the deadly virus, as health officials insist is possible. Even in the United States, with the best conditions and protective gear available, mistakes can happen that expose more people to Ebola, the new case reveals. On Sunday, the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention confirmed infection in the health worker, who was said to have worn full personal protection equipment while caring for Thomas Eric Duncan, a Liberian man who died Wednesday
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Alaska’s gay marriage ban is now history

The state of Alaska will begin accepting marriage applications from same-sex couples the first thing Monday, after a federal judge struck down the state’s ban on gay marriage — the nation’s first such ban approved by voters. The decision late Sunday afternoon caught many people off guard. No rallies were immediately planned, but some plaintiffs celebrated over drinks at an Anchorage bar. Matthew Hamby, who along with his husband Christopher Shelden was one of five couples to sue, was “just having drinks with friends, enjoying it.” He said he was “elated” U.S. District Court Judge Timothy Burgess sided with them,
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