Archives for FUBAR

Memo to Virginians: Stay home on inauguration day

Washington has a curious way of celebrating Barack Obama's inaugural. The authorities are shutting down most of the city for the day.

Particularly hard hit will be the capital's Northern Virginia suburbs. All the downtown bridges between Virginia and Washington will be closed to traffic from 4 a.m. to 7 p.m. and only two of them will be open to pedestrians. One Virginian wondered if they would mine the Potomac River to stop desperate residents of the Old Dominion from paddling across.

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No punishment planned for CIA over torture

As President-elect Barack Obama assures intelligence officials that his complaints are with the Bush administration, not them, there are growing hints from Democratic Senate allies that spy agency veterans will not be prosecuted for past harsh interrogation and detainee policies.

Senate Intelligence Committee Chairman Dianne Feinstein told The Associated Press in an interview this week that there is a clear distinction between those who made the policies and those who carried them out.

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let’s be honest about Abe, shall we?

When Barack Obama takes the oath of office Jan. 20, he will place his left hand on Abraham Lincoln's Bible.

Much has been made of the Lincoln connection, with the first black man assuming the presidency in the 200th anniversary of Honest Abe's birthday. The historic alignment has occasioned renewed spasms of idolatrous odes to "The Great Emancipator."

But before we're all swept away in a paroxysm of national ecstasy, a few inconvenient truths must be noted about "Honest Abe."

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Jobless rate hits 7.2 percent

The nation's unemployment rate bolted to 7.2 percent in December, the highest level in 16 years, as nervous employers slashed 524,000 jobs, capping one of the worst years in modern history for American workers.

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What if the stimulus plan doesn’t work?

While most people in a position of power agree an economic stimulus plan is needed, some are questioning whether or not it will work. The nation doesn't even have a stimulus plan yet and some economists are raising red flags.

Talk about raising on the President-elect's parade.

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More pink slips as economy worsens

Pink slips are piling higher as companies scramble to cut costs even deeper to survive the country's economic and financial storms.

Just days into the new year, managed care provider Cigna Corp., aluminum producer Alcoa Inc., data-storage company EMC Corp. and computer products maker Logitech International were among those announcing layoffs to cope with a recession that has just entered its second year. The flurry of job cuts suggest the employment picture will remain grim this year.

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Report: U.S. ‘shortchanged’ Afghanistan

The United States and its partners have shortchanged Afghanistan by focusing on short-term goals pursued without a cohesive strategy or a clear understanding of the way the poor, decentralized country works, an independent study concludes.

The incoming Obama administration should refocus the U.S. war and rebuilding effort in Afghanistan and think of the project as the work of at least a decade, according to the report compiled by the United States Institute of Peace.

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Inaugural means more traffic problems for DC

On a typical weekday, close to 2 million people commute to the nation's capital, snarling the highways and packing subway trains and buses during peak hours.

Now imagine doubling, or tripling, that for the inauguration.

"I don't want in any way to discourage anyone," said District of Columbia City Administrator Dan Tangherlini. "I just don't want them to come and be completely shocked by what they find."

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Changes in driving habits may spur tax hikes

Motorists are driving less and buying less gasoline, which means fuel taxes aren't raising enough money to keep pace with the cost of road, bridge and transit programs.

That has the federal commission that oversees financing for transportation talking about increasing the federal fuel tax.

A 50 percent increase in gasoline and diesel fuel taxes is being urged by the commission to finance highway construction and repair until the government devises another way for motorists to pay for using public roads.

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Where did the money go? Can’t say. It’s a secret

It's something any bank would demand to know before handing out a loan: Where's the money going?

But after receiving billions in aid from U.S. taxpayers, the nation's largest banks say they can't track exactly how they're spending the money or they simply refuse to discuss it.

"We've lent some of it. We've not lent some of it. We've not given any accounting of, 'Here's how we're doing it,'" said Thomas Kelly, a spokesman for JPMorgan Chase, which received $25 billion in emergency bailout money. "We have not disclosed that to the public. We're declining to."

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