Archives for FUBAR

Governors push home quarantine for Ebola workers

State leaders in New York and New Jersey are at odds with scientists over Ebola as the states’ governors back 21-day quarantines for medical workers returning from West Africa, while the nation’s top infectious-disease expert warns that such restrictions are unnecessary and could discourage volunteers from aiding disease-ravaged countries. The two governors late Sunday night emphasized separately that their policies permit home confinement for medical workers who have had contact with Ebola patients if the workers show no symptoms. They will receive twice-daily monitoring from health officials. The emphasis on home confinement was at odds with the widely criticized treatment
Read More

Could more have been done for Ebola victim Duncan?

When Thomas Eric Duncan became the first diagnosed case of Ebola in the United States, his relatives with roots in virus-ravaged Liberia knew what questions to ask. Would his treatment include experimental drugs? Was a blood transfusion from a survivor an option? What about a transfer from the hospital in Dallas, where he was being treated, to one of four medical centers nationwide that specialize in highly infectious diseases like Ebola? Duncan, poor and uninsured, did not get all the help his family members wanted, and they now question why his care was different in some ways than that of
Read More

Six more states now allowing gay marriage: 32 total now

The federal government is recognizing gay marriage in six more states and extending federal benefits to those couples, Attorney General Eric Holder announced Saturday. Gay marriage recently became legal in Alaska, Arizona, Idaho, North Carolina, West Virginia and Wyoming. The government’s announcement follows the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision earlier this month to decline to hear appeals from five states that sought to keep their marriage bans in place. It brings the total number of states with federal recognition of gay marriage to 32, plus the District of Columbia. Couples married in these states will qualify for a range of federal
Read More

Ebola-striken doctor known as a ‘do-gooder’

Dr. Craig Spencer, the physician now being treated for Ebola in New York City, is the kind of globe-trotting do-gooder who could walk into a small village in Africa and, even though he didn’t know the language, win people over through hugs alone, according to people who worked with him. Even before leaving for Guinea this summer to fight Ebola with Doctors Without Borders, the 33-year-old had amassed an ordinary man’s lifetime worth of world travel, much of which was in the service of the poor. In the past three years alone, Spencer, an attending physician at New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia
Read More

Remains identified as missing Virginia college student

Remains found nearly a week ago in a rural area of Virginia are those of a missing university student, authorities said Friday, as they turned their attention to filing possible additional charges against the suspect accused of abducting her. University of Virginia sophomore Hannah Graham, 18, disappeared Sept. 13 after a night out with friends. The remains were found Oct. 18 about 12 miles from the Charlottesville campus, in a heavily wooded area of Albemarle County that is home to rolling hills and horse farms. The state Medical Examiner’s office confirmed that the remains were Graham’s, the Albermarle County Police
Read More

Three quarantined along with first Ebola case in New York

A doctor who became New York City’s first Ebola patient was praised for getting treatment immediately upon showing symptoms, and health officials stressed that the nation’s most populous city need not fear his wide-ranging travel in the days before his illness began. Mayor Bill de Blasio and Gov. Andrew Cuomo urged residents not to be alarmed by the doctor’s diagnosis Thursday, even as they described him riding the subway, taking a cab and bowling since returning to New York from Guinea a week ago. De Blasio said all city officials followed “clear and strong” protocols in their handling and treatment
Read More

A crash course in Ebola and the climate of fear it spawns

Ebola is giving Americans a crash course in fear. Yet, they’re incredibly less likely to get the disease than to get sick worrying about it. First, the reality check: More Americans have married Kim Kardashian — three — than contracted Ebola in the U.S. The two Dallas nurses who came down with Ebola were infected while treating a Liberian man, who became infected in West Africa. The New York doctor who has tested positive for Ebola had been treating people in West Africa. Still, schools have been closed, people shunned and members of Congress have demanded travel bans and other
Read More

Ebola lawsuits could face major hurdles

In a land of lawsuits, this case seems made for litigation: A doctor appears to miss a red flag, an Ebola diagnosis is delayed, and a patient dies. But this is Texas. It may not matter much that Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas apologized for initially misdiagnosing Thomas Eric Duncan, who was sent home from the ER but later returned sicker and farther along on a painful decline to death. Insulated by Texas tort reform that gives an extra layer of protection to emergency room doctors and nurses, not only is the very feasibility of winning complicated, but the potential
Read More

Yet another jumper of the White House fence

  The latest person to climb over the White House fence had the paranoid belief he was being watched by cameras and had previously been arrested at the executive mansion, his father said. Dominic Adesanya, 23, of Bel Air, Maryland, was ordered held without bond in an appearance Thursday before a federal magistrate judge. Wearing blue prison garb, he resisted being taken away and started talking as two deputy marshals removed him from the courtroom. Adesanya has been charged with two federal offenses: unlawfully entering the restricted grounds of the White House and harming two law enforcement dogs that were
Read More

Three states still defy court rulings allowing gay marriages

The writing is on the wall for gay marriage bans in Kansas, Montana and South Carolina after federal appeals courts that oversee those states have made clear that keeping gay and lesbian couples from marrying is unconstitutional. But officials in the three states are refusing to allow same-sex couples to obtain marriage licenses without a court order directing them to do so. It could be another month or more before the matter is settled. In a political campaign debate Monday, Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback vowed to defend his state’s constitutional amendment defining marriage as between a man and a woman.
Read More