Archives for FUBAR

Widespread abuse of government credit cards

Laser eye surgery may improve one's visual horizons, but it doesn't qualify as a travel expense, a congressional office says in a report on abuses of the federal travel card system.

The Congressional Research Service, in a recent survey, found that federal employees in a wide range of agencies misuse travel cards to buy goods for their personal use, travel first-class or simply bilk the government.


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So, what happens to Detroit now?

It's surreal to be here in the Motor City these days, wondering how or if it will reinvent itself. As Pittsburgh was once Steel City and then became a Mecca for medical researchers, one wonders if this symbol of man's ingenuity in moving around will find new life or decay even more.


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Let’s face it: America is broke

"We're out of money," President Obama admitted. "We're operating in deep deficits," he said in a C-Span interview last week.

While Obama is refreshingly realistic, he resembles a man who strolls into a bar, sees that his wallet is empty, and then slaps a round of drinks for everyone onto his wheezing credit card.


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RIP for AOL

Time Warner's long corporate nightmare is almost over. It announced that it would dump AOL by spinning off the onetime new media giant as an independent company by the end of the year.

The 2001 merger of AOL and Time Warner, a deal valued at $124 billion, was hailed as the marriage of new media and old media with trendy new media in the driver's seat. It was a short trip.

The dot-com bubble burst. AOL's stock turned out to be greatly overvalued, its business model in decline and, moreover, the two corporate cultures grew to detest each other.


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What should the U.S. do about North Korea?

North Korea is rattling the saber again. But this time, Kim Jong Il may unsheathe his sword on South Korea and U.S. troops stationed there.

Pyongyang this week tested a nuclear weapon and launched three missiles in two days over the Sea of Japan. The North Koreans then said they would no longer recognize the 1953 armistice that suspended the Korean War and threatened Seoul with attack if South Korea attempted to search any North Korean ships for unlawful nuclear materials.


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Can Republicans risk a fight over Sotomayor?

For the Republican Party, already reeling over recent suicidal moves, a fight over the nomination of Sonia Sotomayor to the Supreme Court seems doomed appears doomed from the start.

Such a fight would further erode support for the party among Hispanics at a time when the party needs to broaden its support to regain political strength.

Even some Republicans admit taking on Sotomayor is a risky strategy.


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Soldier suicides force Army base shutdown

With the stress of prolonged wars, extended tours and multiple deployments driving American military men and women to the brink, a major army base shut down for three days yesterday because of a rash of suicides.

At least 11 deaths at Fort Campell, KY, over the past year have come from suicide with 64 members of the Army taking their lives over the six months. Commanders say the rate of self-inflicted deaths will set a record.

The report follows the murder of soldiers by another soldier in Iraq and reports of escalating mental problems among military men and women.


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Former Bush Homeland Security pick indicted

Former New York police commissioner Bernard Kerik, the man former President George W. Bush wanted to head Homeland Security, now faces charges of lying about taking bribes from contractors who rennovated his New York apartment while serving as the Big Apple's top cop.

A federal grand jury indicted Kerik for making false statements about his relationships with the contractors during the vetting process for the Homeland Security job.


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