FUBAR

Mixed results for military tribunals

After years of battling to install a flawed system for dealing with terrorist detainees, the Bush administration finally got its first trial by military commission, a proceeding not seen since the aftermath of World War II.

Pay it down, pay it off

I began a conversation with David Briggs in last week’s column, about Americans and our staggeringly high and steadily increasing consumer debt (find it at betsysblog.com). We Americans are awash in it.

This week — it’s what to do about it.

All talk, no action…as usual

If you were advising a friend who was unfit and lacking energy, would you tell him to diet or exercise? You’d probably suggest he do both.

Manufactured news ain’t news

This is a cautionary tale about how journalism sometimes gets practiced in contemporary America.

A few weeks ago, a Wall Street Journal reporter named Amy Chozick got a bright idea for a news story: In a nation where according to our public health authorities nearly two-thirds of the adult population is too fat, is Barack Obama too skinny to be elected president?

Note to the Olympics: I’m ready

I have always dreamed of competing in the Olympic Games. Sadly, as with so many who have dared to dream of glory, the only thing that held me back was lack of athletic talent.

It seems so unfair given the level of my desire. With the Beijing Olympics opening on Friday, I should be rejoicing but instead I am reminded of my old limitations.

Was anti-gun activist an NRA spy?

A gun-control activist who championed the cause for more than a decade and served on the boards of two anti-violence groups is suspected of working as a paid spy for the National Rifle Association, and now those organizations are expelling her and sweeping their offices for bugs.

Solid evidence or just a vendetta?

Seven years later, the FBI is said to be ready to go public with documents and explanations about its investigation into the fatal anthrax attacks that still has no definitive culprit.

We can’t drive 55…or 65

In 1984, I split the driving with a friend on a trip from north Minnesota to south Texas, some 1,500 miles. He cruised between 75 and 80 mph, with a watchful eye on the rearview mirror and on the radar detector.

A lesson of history for today’s world

It is said that you can line up all the world’s economists end-to-end and still never reach a conclusion. However, one crucial consensus seems to be emerging in recent years among market watchers: the Reagan era of deregulation is coming to an end.

We spend too much on our kids

We parents on average spend five times more on our kids today than we did 25 year ago, and that’s in real dollars. So David Briggs, head of the Good Sense Financial Stewardships Ministry at Willow Creek Community Church in South Barrington, Ill., told me.