Archives for FUBAR

Discrimination ruling leaves many questions

The Supreme Court ruling in favor of white New Haven firefighters who said they were victims of reverse discrimination will probably leave employers confused, civil rights advocates and labor attorneys say.

The court ruled 5-4 Monday that the white firefighters were denied promotions unfairly because of their race, reversing a decision that high court nominee Sonia Sotomayor endorsed as a federal appeals court judge.


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Sotomayor critics cheer court ruling

Foes of Supreme Court nominee Sonia Sotomayor celebrated the high court's reversal of her decision in a reverse discrimination case.

The 5-4 ruling Monday, backing of reverse discrimination claims by white firefighters, is unlikely to derail Sotomayor's nomination — and it may not even sway a vote. Reaction to the decision fell almost purely along partisan lines, with Republicans cheering the decision and saying it raises serious concerns about the judge, and Democrats condemning the opinion and arguing that Sotomayor had acted appropriately.


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Say what? Some teens expect to die young

A surprising number of teenagers — nearly 15 percent — think they're going to die young, leading many to drug use, suicide attempts and other unsafe behavior, new research suggests.

The study, based on a survey of more than 20,000 kids, challenges conventional wisdom that says teens engage in risky behavior because they think they're invulnerable to harm. Instead, a sizable number of teens may take chances "because they feel hopeless and figure that not much is at stake," said study author Dr. Iris Borowsky, a researcher at the University of Minnesota.
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Congressman’s wife cops a plea

Detroit City Council member Monica Conyers, the wife of powerful and popular Democratic congressman John Conyers, pleaded guilty Friday to accepting cash bribes in exchange for supporting a sludge contract with a Houston company.

Conyers, a political unknown who won her council seat in 2005 largely on her husband's name, admitted in federal court to a single count of conspiracy to commit bribery, responding quietly to questions from Judge Avern Cohn.

She faces up to five years in prison and a $250,000 fine when she's sentenced.


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So, Mr. President, where are the jobs?

Republicans concerned about the Obama administration's big spending on economic stimulus, energy and health care are asking, "Where are the jobs?"

"The president and Democrats in Congress claim this spending binge is necessary to put Americans back to work," House Republican leader John Boehner said Saturday in the Republican radio and Internet address. "They promised unemployment would not rise above 8 percent if their trillion-dollar stimulus was passed.


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Remembering an unlikely martyr

I cannot get Neda out of my mind. Neda Agha-Soltan, to be precise. Neda is the woman the world watched die on videotape that was uploaded last weekend to the Internet. She was the woman slaughtered, apparently, by Iranian government gunfire last Saturday during anti-government protests and riots in Tehran.

If you've been online since last weekend, and you've been following the brave Iranian protests against that country's all-but-certainly stolen national elections, you know exactly who Neda is.


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Is there hope for Iran?

A blatantly fraudulent election may have been the spark that ignited Iran's current rebellion but don't be misled: Iran has never had free and fair elections.

I was in Iran 30 years ago for the first elections held under the gaze of Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, the dourly militant leader of Iran's Islamist revolution. I was a young and inexperienced foreign correspondent unconvinced by older and more experienced foreign correspondents that Khomeini and his followers intended to transform Iran into a freer and more just society, rather than one that would be brutally oppressive at home and threatening abroad.
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Iran will never be the same

The absolute moral authority of Iran's supreme leader has unraveled with the swiftness and absolute irreversibility of a turban caught in a ceiling fan. It happened right before our eyes and more importantly, before the eyes of the Iranian people.

Iranians do not yet know what the outcome will be, let alone the fates of the courageous citizens who followed their beliefs into the streets. But a reality has begun to set in, fed and spread by the visual truths Twittered around the planet:

Iran will never again be the same.


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Is “public option” just a smokescreen?

Barack Obama made health care reform a centerpiece of his presidential campaign. But the politics of health care are never as straightforward as they appear, and what seemed like a sure thing a few months ago is now shaping up into a real donnybrook as Congress takes up an actual bill.


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Another Republican admits screwing around

The Republican Party may claim they are the home of family values but it seems more and more of the GOP faithful are leaving home and getting some on the road.

South Carolina Gov. Mark Sanford became the latest Republican to admit he just can't keep it in his pants, admitting to an affair with a Argentine woman.

Sanford also apparently lied repeatedly to his own staff about his prolonged absences from his office, saying he was hiking the Appalachian Trail when he was -- in fact -- porking his mistress.


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