Archives for FUBAR

Split Congress could mean more gridlock on Capitol Hill

Republicans grabbed the steering wheel of the U.S. House of Representatives on Tuesday, but weren’t expected to get out of the driveway when it comes to restraining Wall Street reforms and fixing housing finance. A political standoff lies ahead for two years on key banking and housing issues as election returns showed Democrats losing control of the House, but retaining a narrow majority in the U.S. Senate, as widely expected. President Barack Obama’s veto and Democratic Senate power will likely block any attempts by Republicans to roll back the landmark Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act that Obama
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It’s a strange election year when comedians call for reason and sanity

In the shadow of the Capitol and the election, comedians Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert entertained a huge throng Saturday at a “sanity” rally poking fun at the nation’s ill-tempered politics, fear-mongers and doomsayers. “We live now in hard times,” Stewart said after all the shtick. “Not end times.” Part comedy show, part pep talk, the rally drew together tens of thousands stretched across an expanse of the National Mall, a festive congregation of the goofy and the politically disenchanted. People carried signs merrily protesting the existence of protest signs. Some dressed like bananas, wizards, Martians and Uncle Sam. Stewart,
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Question of the day: Who really wanted Meek out of Florida Senate race?

Florida’s three-way Senate race grew testier Friday as the last-place Democratic candidate denied claims that former President Bill Clinton had advised him to drop out, saying the idea came instead from his independent rival, Gov. Charlie Crist. Rep. Kendrick Meek went on national morning TV news shows to swat down reports that he had told Clinton, who was campaigning for Meek, that he would drop out to improve Crist’s chances of defeating the front-runner, Republican Marco Rubio. Crist left the GOP to run as an independent after Rubio led him before the Republican primary. Meek said it was Crist who
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Out of control polls: Curse of the Internet age

When a widely publicized poll showed Republican John Kasich with a commanding, 10-point advantage in Ohio’s governor’s race, aides to Democratic Gov. Ted Strickland fought back hard. Against the poll. “With just two weeks until Election Day, it is our opinion that the Quinnipiac polls are irresponsible, inaccurate and completely removed from the reality of the Ohio governor’s race,” the campaign said in a statement that noted other private and public surveys were showing a much closer contest. The Quinnipiac University Polling Institute, an organization with an unchallenged reputation for nonpartisanship, responded mildly. “We stand by our numbers and our
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Bringing home the bacon can put incumbents in the frying pan

 When Harry Reid, the No. 1 Democrat in the Senate, began his re-election campaign last year, he ran ads touting his ability to bring hundreds of millions of dollars in federal largess back to Nevada. “From Vegas to Reno, Carson City to Elko, he’s helped build roads, hospitals and schools,” said an early television ad. His poll numbers barely moved. Now, Reid’s running an ad boasting that he’s brought more than 1,300 “green jobs” to the state. He’s still neck and neck with tea party favorite Sharron Angle. Republicans are betting that Nevada’s angry electorate — infused with many
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Rand Paul supporter ordered to court over altercation

The volunteer with Rand Paul‘s Republican U.S. Senate campaign who stepped on the head of a liberal activist and pinned her face to the concrete said Tuesday the scuffle was not as bad as it looked on video and blamed police for not intervening. “I’m sorry that it came to that, and I apologize if it appeared overly forceful, but I was concerned about Rand’s safety,” Tim Profitt told The Associated Press. A judge will decide whether Profitt should face criminal charges. Lauren Valle, the 23-year-old activist with the group MoveOn.org, said her face was swollen and her neck and
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Voters still blame the people, not the system

As if incumbents didn’t already have enough to worry about, add one more thing to the list. Optimism about the American system of government is at a 36-year low, yet most Americans blame the people in office — not the system itself — for all that’s going wrong, according to a new ABC News/Yahoo! News poll. That means bad news ahead for incumbents on Election Day — particularly those of the Democratic variety. The underlying message of the new poll seems to be that new blood on Capitol Hill is the first step in getting back on track. “In bad
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Angry gay voters a problem for Democrats

Kate Coatar is seriously considering voting for Green Party candidates instead of Democrats, whom she normally supports. James Wyatt won’t cast a ballot at all because he no longer trusts anyone to fight for causes important to him. If Democratic candidates are counting on long-standing support from gay voters to help stave off big losses on Nov. 2, they could be in for a surprise. Across the country, activists say gay voters are angry — at the lack of progress on issues from eliminating employment discrimination to uncertainty over serving in the military to the economy — and some are
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Struggling Americans to candidates: Fix the economy, stupid

Boarded-up homes and empty storefronts dot the once-prosperous town of Elkhart, Indiana, where those still struggling to recover from the economic collapse of 2008 have a simple message for politicians ahead of key mid-term elections: fix the economy, stupid. While the worst economic downturn to strike the United States since the Great Depression may have officially ended in June of last year, some 14.1 million people across the country remain officially unemployed. That’s a strong improvement from the 16.1 million who were actively looking for work when unemployment peaked at 10.6 percent in January. But it’s a far cry from
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The more things change, the more they will stay the same

Change at the top? Not necessarily. Whichever party controls the House and Senate after the Nov. 2 election probably will install the same leaders whose policymaking helped bring about the sour economy, nearly double-digit unemployment and deficit spending that has led voters to call for fresh faces. Different lineups could mean different fates for health care, taxation, government spending and regulation, energy and foreign policy, and President Barack Obama‘s bid for a second term. The newly elected, no matter how a big their freshman class, will have to wait for power. At most, they may get junior leadership seats in
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