Archives for FUBAR

More and more Americans lack health insurance

Nearly 59 million Americans went without health insurance coverage for at least part of 2010, many of them with conditions or diseases that needed treatment, federal health officials said on Tuesday. They said 4 million more Americans went without insurance in the first part of 2010 than during the same time in 2008. “Both adults and kids lost private coverage over the past decade,” Dr. Thomas Frieden, director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, told a news briefing. The findings have implications for U.S. healthcare reform efforts. A bill passed in March promises to get health insurance
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Too much money in elections? Just wait

All those campaign ads and cash? Just wait until 2012. The next election will bring an explosion of political money — perhaps hundreds of millions more than ever before — without effective spending limits, a fundraising bar raised sky high by Barack Obama in his presidential campaign in 2008 and multimillion-dollar fuel added by Republican outside groups this year. The $5.3 billion spent in 2008 and $4 billion anticipated tab this year? A hint of things to come. Republicans considering running for president are preparing to sidestep the federal public financing system, eager to follow the example Obama set in
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Even Republicans are fed up with Sarah Palin

With the mid-term elections out of the way, establishment Republicans are now focusing their attack machine on a new target: Sarah Palin. Even former President George W. Bush is taking a potshot or two. The list of those going after the former Governor of Alaska is growing daily. Sources inside the Republican Party tell Capitol Hill Blue that Bush is telling other Republicans that Palin isn’t qualified to be President and says Arizona Sen. John McCain was an idiot to put her on the ticket as his running mate in the 2008 Presidential elections. While Bush hasn’t made his concerns
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Olbermann suspension ends Tuesday

MSNBC says Keith Olbermann will be back on the air Tuesday, ending his suspension for violating NBC’s rules against making political donations after two shows. MSNBC’s chief executive Phil Griffin said late Sunday that after several days of deliberation, he had determined that two days off the air was “an appropriate punishment for his violation of our policy.” The left-leaning cable network’s most popular personality acknowledged donating $2,400 apiece to the campaigns of Kentucky Senate candidate Jack Conway and Arizona Reps. Raul Grijalva and Gabrielle Giffords. NBC News prohibits its employees from making political donations unless an exception is granted
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Uh oh…Republicans control redistricting too

Republicans don’t just control much of the electoral map. In some cases, they now have the power to redraw it. Overwhelming victories in statehouses and governors’ races across the country this week have placed the GOP in command of redrawing both congressional and legislative districts to conform with Census results. It’s a grueling and politically charged process that typically gives the party in power an inherent advantage for a decade, allowing them to preserve current strongholds or to put others in play. Along with gains in governorships this week, Republicans picked up about 680 legislative seats — twice the number
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Bush book not kind to John McCain

Sen. John McCain never asked then-President George W. Bush to campaign for him in 2008, though Bush thinks he could have helped the Arizona senator. In his forthcoming memoir, “Decision Points,” Bush explores his “complex relationship” with McCain. “I understood he had to establish his independence,” Bush wrote. “I thought it looked defensive for John to distance himself from me. I was confident I could have helped him make his case. But the decision was his. I was disappointed I couldn’t do more to help him.” The 43rd president suggests his opponent for the Republican nomination in 2000 blew an
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Election may be over but divided government remains

Barely an hour after President Barack Obama invited congressional Republicans to post-election talks to work together on major issues, the Senate’s GOP leader had a blunt message: His party’s main goal is denying Obama re-election. In a sign that combat and the 2012 elections rather than compromise could mark the next two years, Sen. Mitch McConnell on Thursday called for Senate votes to repeal or erode Obama’s signature health care law, to cut spending and to shrink government. “The only way to do all these things it is to put someone in the White House who won’t veto any of
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Two faces will represent a divided America

United on almost nothing, Barack Obama and John Boehner are the two faces of America’s divided government, the humbled president and the triumphant House leader. Both claim to speak for the people, yet they have had little to say to each other. This is the relationship that will drive everything. On first appearance, both men put on a public display Wednesday intended to emphasize what voters want: cooperation to create jobs. A reflective Obama acknowledged the drubbing his party took in Tuesday’s elections; Boehner, the speaker-in-waiting, seemed intent not to gloat. Yet the clearer reality is that these are men
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Split Congress could mean more gridlock on Capitol Hill

Republicans grabbed the steering wheel of the U.S. House of Representatives on Tuesday, but weren’t expected to get out of the driveway when it comes to restraining Wall Street reforms and fixing housing finance. A political standoff lies ahead for two years on key banking and housing issues as election returns showed Democrats losing control of the House, but retaining a narrow majority in the U.S. Senate, as widely expected. President Barack Obama’s veto and Democratic Senate power will likely block any attempts by Republicans to roll back the landmark Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act that Obama
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It’s a strange election year when comedians call for reason and sanity

In the shadow of the Capitol and the election, comedians Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert entertained a huge throng Saturday at a “sanity” rally poking fun at the nation’s ill-tempered politics, fear-mongers and doomsayers. “We live now in hard times,” Stewart said after all the shtick. “Not end times.” Part comedy show, part pep talk, the rally drew together tens of thousands stretched across an expanse of the National Mall, a festive congregation of the goofy and the politically disenchanted. People carried signs merrily protesting the existence of protest signs. Some dressed like bananas, wizards, Martians and Uncle Sam. Stewart,
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