Archives for FUBAR

Delay in treatments before Ebola patient died

A surgeon who contracted Ebola in his native Sierra Leone did not receive aggressive treatment until nearly two weeks after he first started showing symptoms — a delay that doctors said probably made it impossible for anyone to save his life. Dr. Martin Salia was in the 13th day of his illness when he reached Omaha on Saturday. It took three days for him to be formally diagnosed after an initial test for Ebola came back negative and then another five days to be flown to the United States. By the time the 44-year-old Maryland man got to the University
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State Dept. shuts down email after hacked

The State Department has taken the unprecedented step of shutting down its entire unclassified email system as technicians repair possible damage from a suspected hacker attack. A senior department official said Sunday that “activity of concern” was detected in the system around the same time as a previously reported incident that targeted the White House computer network. That incident was made public in late October, but there was no indication then that the State Department had been affected. Since then, a number of agencies, including the U.S. Postal Service and the National Weather Service, have reported attacks. The official said
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Hagel says Iraqi troops on fast-track training

Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel said Sunday that the U.S. military is accelerating its efforts to train and advise Iraqi forces fighting Islamic State militants. Hagel said U.S. special operations troops in Iraq’s western Anbar province are getting an early start on the train-and-advise effort. He said the effort began a few days ago, but did not provide details. The Pentagon chief spoke to reporters after observing Army training in California’s Mojave Desert. According to plans laid out last week, the U.S. expects to train nine Iraqi security forces brigades and three Kurdish Peshmerga brigades. Hagel said the speed-up was recommended
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Record number of foreign students at U.S. schools

  The number of foreign exchange students studying at U.S. colleges and universities is at a record high, with nearly one-third coming from China. A report by the Institute of International Education, in partnership with the State Department’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, said nearly 900,000 international students were studying in the U.S. during the 2013-14 school year, up 8 percent from a year earlier. During the same period, there was a nearly 17 percent increase in the number of Chinese students. The other top countries of origin were India, South Korea, Saudi Arabia and Canada. The United States
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Another American beheaded in Syria

The White House on Sunday confirmed the death of U.S. aid worker Peter Kassig, a former soldier who tried to help wounded Syrians caught in a brutal civil war but ended up dying himself at the hands of Islamic State militants. President Barack Obama, in a statement issued as he flew back to Washington after a trip to the Asia Pacific region, said the group “revels in the slaughter of innocents, including Muslims, and is bent only on sowing death and destruction.” With Kassig’s death, IS has killed five Westerners it was holding. Britons David Haines, a former Air Force
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Homeless children on the rise in America

The number of homeless children in the U.S. has surged in recent years to an all-time high, amounting to one child in every 30, according to a comprehensive state-by-state report that blames the nation’s high poverty rate, the lack of affordable housing and the impacts of pervasive domestic violence. Titled “America’s Youngest Outcasts,” the report being issued Monday by the National Center on Family Homelessness calculates that nearly 2.5 million American children were homeless at some point in 2013. The number is based on the Department of Education’s latest count of 1.3 million homeless children in public schools, supplemented by
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Fomer Navy SEAL: No apologies for breaking oath

Former Navy SEAL Robert O’Neill, who says he fired the shots that killed Osama bin Laden, played a role in some of the most consequential combat missions of the post-9/11 era, including three depicted in Hollywood movies. And now he’s telling the world about them. By doing so, O’Neill has almost certainly increased his earning power on the speaking circuit. He also may have put himself and his family at greater risk. And he has earned the enmity of some current and former SEALs by violating their code of silence. But O’Neill, winner of two Silver and five Bronze Stars,
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Government granting refugee status to some children

The U.S. government will launch a program in December to grant refugee status to some people under the age of 21 who live in Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador and whose parents legally reside in the United States. U.S. officials say parents can ask authorities free of charge for refugee status for their children in the Central American countries, which are plagued by poverty and vicious gang violence. The program does not apply to minors who have arrived in the U.S. illegally. Vice President Joe Biden announced the program Friday at the Inter-American Development Bank, where the presidents of the
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Obama plans to keep 5 million illegals in America

The Obama administration is considering a plan that would shield possibly around 5 million immigrants living in the country illegally from deportation as part of a broad set of executive actions that President Barack Obama could announce as early as next week, people familiar with the discussions say. Obama has pledged to move on the measures by year’s end, and White House officials are debating whether to act soon after he returns this weekend from his current trip to Asia and Australia or wait until after Congress approves a major spending bill in December. A senior Obama administration official said
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Civil rights pioneer: racism remains in America

Civil rights pioneer Ruby Bridges says America today looks a lot like the world she helped break apart 54 years ago: A nation with segregated schools and racial tension. “You almost feel like you’re back in the ’60s,” said Bridges, who is now 60 years old. “The conversation across the country, and it doesn’t leave out New Orleans, is that schools are reverting back” to being segregated along racial lines, she said. “We all know that there are schools being segregated again.” On Nov. 14, 1960, Bridges — then 6 years old — became the first black student to attend
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