FUBAR

High Court asked to block Chrysler sale

Indiana pension funds and consumer groups asked the U.S. Supreme Court on Sunday to stop the sale of bankrupt automaker Chrysler LLC to a group led by Italian carmaker Fiat SpA while they challenge the deal.

The separate requests, which moved the legal battle to the nation’s highest court, were filed after a U.S. appeals court in New York approved Chrysler’s sale to a group led by Fiat, a union-aligned trust and the U.S. and Canadian governments.

Unemployment rate hits 9.4 percent

With companies in no mood to hire, the unemployment rate jumped to 9.4 percent in May, the highest in more than 25 years. But the pace of layoffs eased, with employers cutting 345,000 jobs, the fewest since September.

The much smaller-than-expected reduction in payroll jobs, reported by the Labor Department on Friday, adds to evidence that the recession is loosening its hold on the country. It marked the fourth straight month that the pace of layoffs slowed.

DHS nominee faces questions on CIA tactics

The Obama administration’s pick for a top intelligence post at the Homeland Security Department is expected to face questions from senators about his ties to the CIA’s harsh interrogations of terror suspects.

At issue is the extent of Philip Mudd’s involvement in the CIA’s interrogation program while he was a senior official at the agency during the Bush administration. Mudd was nominated to be under secretary of intelligence and analysis at Homeland Security. His confirmation hearing is expected next week.

Spending our way into oblivion

President Dwight Eisenhower gave the nation a farewell address 48 years ago in which he outlined an urgent warning.

That warning is coming true. We are spending our way into oblivion.

Just another day in the neighborhood

It’s just another typical day in the neighborhood filled, as Walter Cronkite used to say, "with the events that alter and illuminate our times."

First there’s the question whether the Obama-designed bailout of General Motors and Chrysler will work or whether ultimately the taxpayers will be stuck with an enormous bill trying to save the un-savable, leaving Ford to carry the torch for an industry that once was the envy of the world.

Obama should reconsider closing Gitmo

President Obama has the perfect reason to abandon his foolish promise to close Guantanamo: The American people overwhelmingly reject his policy. Popular opinion aside, keeping Gitmo full of homicidal Muslim maniacs still makes sense.

Among 1,015 adults USA Today/Gallup surveyed between May 29-31, 65 percent oppose closing Guantanamo and moving some detainees to U.S. prisons. Only 32 percent favor this proposal. Asked if they want Gitmo shut and some detainees transferred to "a prison in your state," 74 percent of respondents disagree; just 23 percent approve.

Does pro-life rhetoric incite murder?

The murder of Kansas abortion doctor George Tiller has renewed the vociferous national debate between pro-lifers and pro-choicers with a new twist. Defenders of abortion rights now say that opponents — notably Fox News’ Bill O’Reilly — contributed to Tiller’s death with the decades-long use of incendiary language labeling the doctor "Tiller the Baby Killer."

The lesson from Dr. Tiller’s murder

If you want to see the future of one aspect of life in the United States, if federal policy were placed in the hands of murderous antiabortion extremists, you might look at life for women in Tanzania.

Abortion is illegal there, as antiabortion extremists (I am not referring herewith to mainstream pro-lifers) pledge to fight until it is made illegal here. As a result, pregnant women who do not want or cannot carry pregnancies to term turn to amateurs who botch their abortions in large percentages. As reported by the New York Times this week:

Officials charged with stealing Christian humanitarian funds

Three former officials with a Christian humanitarian organization have been accused of massive fraud involving more than $1 million worth of U.S. aid to Liberia, stealing food and construction materials meant to help people of the African nation recover from a 14-year civil war.

Cheney backpedals on earlier claims

Former Vice President Dick Cheney, under fire for bombastic, misleading and outright lies about claimed Bush Administration "successes" in the so-called "war on terror," is changing his story.

Now, after years of claiming Iraqi involvement in the 9/11 terrorist attacks — one of the "justifications" used by the Bush White House to sell the invasion of Iraq — Cheney now admits no such link existed.